1. Welcome to TalkBass, the Premier Bass Player Community and Information Source. Register a FREE Account to post and unlock tons of features!

Piccolo bass vs 8 string bass for a solo player

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Sgroh87, Feb 14, 2014.


  1. Sgroh87

    Sgroh87

    Dec 4, 2012
    DFW, Texas
    Hey guys,

    I've been playing bass seriously for about a year now after switching from saxophone. I jam occasionally but I spend a lot of time playing in my bedroom by myself I currently have a set of six string basses that I absolutely love. I can play regular bass lines for jamming with groups, but I can also jump up and play melodic and chord stuff when I'm playing by myself.

    I have a sizable tax return coming this year and I'm trying to decide what to do with it. I was thinking about the fact that I play alone a lot so I was trying to find something that would work well in a solo setting. I was originally planning on getting a bass and stringing it with piccolo strings, but then I saw a video of an 8 string coursed bass that really intrigued me. It certainly wouldn't fit in every group situation, but for small groups (say, bass, drummer, and vocalist; or maybe bass, drummer, lead guitar) or solo playing it looks great. You can play a guitar register melody with a bass backing you up the whole time!

    On the other hand, a piccolo bass is just a regular bass with thin strings, and if I don't like the piccolo sound I can just restring it as a regular bass.

    What do you guys think? Anyone had experience with either or both of these instruments? Which one did you prefer, and why?
     
  2. The tuning of a piccolo bass is the same as the 4 low ones on a guitar. EADG.

    Many play & enjoy them: Stanley Clarke & Michael Manring to name two.
     
  3. Sponsored by:


    to hide this ad and more.
  4. Sgroh87

    Sgroh87

    Dec 4, 2012
    DFW, Texas
    Right, and an 8 string bass is the bass equivalent of a 12 string guitar - pairs of strings tuned EADG in octaves: EeAaDdGg. That would result in playing in two octaves at the same time.
     
  5. Sgroh87

    Sgroh87

    Dec 4, 2012
    DFW, Texas
  6. SteveC

    SteveC

    Nov 12, 2004
    North Dakota
    Well, if you want octaves all the time, a coursed 8 string is what you want. There are also 8 string basses if you want all the range but not always octaves. There's a nice Roscoe 8 string for sale in the classifieds right now.

    To me, I'd get tired of hearing the octaves all the time.
     
  7. Sgroh87

    Sgroh87

    Dec 4, 2012
    DFW, Texas
    Well, it wouldn't be my main bass, so I wouldn't be hearing them ALL the time. It would be more for some of my solo playing and occasional small jam for thickening the sound. I bet chords sound really cool on an instrument like this.

    That being said, a coursed 8 is always a coursed 8. A piccolo can be restrung as a regular 4 string bass. I need to see if I can find an 8 string to play around with.
     
  8. woodyng

    woodyng

    Dec 19, 2007
    Oregon coast
    Chris Squire tunes his D and G strings in Fifths. Makes for some interesting sounds.
     

  9. There sure is! Wish I could afford that Roscoe. I have subscribed to it, wishing I could come into the cash.
     
  10. SteveC

    SteveC

    Nov 12, 2004
    North Dakota
    Yeah, I don't think Roscoe had made a bass I don't want - no matter what the string count.
     
  11. Sgroh87

    Sgroh87

    Dec 4, 2012
    DFW, Texas
    Yeah, I do love extended range basses. Like I said, I currently only own six string basses. That being said, I occasionally miss the simplicity of four strings (or four courses, in this case). A narrower neck with fewer strings makes for an instrument for relaxing and goofing around with. No offense to those who play 4 strings exclusively, of course. :)
     



Share This Page