Playing from the Heart v.2

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Progfan44, Jan 24, 2013.


  1. Progfan44

    Progfan44

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2012
    Location:
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    I put up a thread kinda similar to this a while back and I got a lot of awesome advice from it, but with this one I hope to be more specific on a problem in my playing I've recently stumbled on. I have received criticisms from some people saying my playing and written material are far too "theoretical" and contrived, which I agree wholeheartedly with. While playing I tend to stay in scale positions and often don't think enough about the specifics of what notes I'm playing, I rather just play whatever notes my hand happens to hit in that position of whatever scale will work. While this is purely an improvisation problem, this approach also hinders my written material. I'm starting a fusion band with a friend of mine and I find I can't compose with my instrument, and rather write out parts on guitar pro in accordance with what works and pay little mind to tonal characteristics. This is very frustrating as it is very discouraging and has given me a negative attitude for jamming, something crucial for jazz. So does anyone have some advice for increasing one's ability to translate thoughts/ideas into playing, or to make improvisation a lot more fun and meaningful than simply a game of "what finger goes where".
    Thanks for any advice!
    (P.S, I started this on the technique thread, but decided to post it here because this question is a lot more suited to this category)
     
  2. MalcolmAmos

    MalcolmAmos Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2009
    Location:
    Deep East Texas Piney Woods
    Improv or playing what is in the heart, IMO, comes from things stored. Improv is calling upon things that we have done before. It's not random notes, from the same scale, strung together. There is some basic theory involved within any melody. Melody first, then improvise your rendition of that melody by letting that melody be the guide for your improvisation. OK, but, where do melodies come from? Hal says one place is from the chord tones. Chicken or egg....

    See what Hal has to say about improvising around the 3rds.
     

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