Precision or Hollow Body for diversity?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by SteveC, Feb 17, 2014.


  1. SteveC

    SteveC

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Forks, North Dakota
    I have a wonderful Roscoe Century Standard Plus 5 with Bartolini Soaps and preamp. My "modern active 5 string" needs are covered. While I'd love to have another Roscoe - or two - I am thinking it might be nice to have a completely different kind of bass to compliment/contrast my Roscoe.

    I was thinking of getting an American Standard Precision, but have seen a few players using hollow bodies. My local store is now a dealer for D'Angelico guitars. They just received 3 guitars that look and sound amazing. No bass in stock, but D'Angelico makes a semi hollow bass that looks pretty cool.

    http://dangelicoguitars.com/standard/ex-bass/

    Anyone have any thoughts? Any experience with hollow bodies.
  2. lz4005

    lz4005

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2013
    If you want a good variety of instruments to cover all the bases (no pun intended), I'd go with a P as a 2nd. Then a fretless. Then a hollowbody.

    But that's just me.
  3. Marko5657

    Marko5657 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Location:
    N.E. Ohio
    I agree with getting something different instead of another one that’s similar.

    Tough choice between the P and the hollowbody-- either would be awesome.

    If I played four-strings, I'd be seriously thinking about a hollow body-- they're the only guitars I play.
  4. smcd

    smcd Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2009
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    I dunno.... I'd be a little wary of buying a Korean-made hollowbody without playing it first. Those basses are priced in the range of the new Gibson hollowbody basses.
  5. Lowbrow

    Lowbrow Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    I've always loved the way hollowbodies look and am always unhappy with the way they sound. Think it's a lot easier to make a P sound somewhat like a hollowbody than the other way around.
  6. SteveC

    SteveC

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Forks, North Dakota
    Yeah. The look is maybe more interesting than the sound. My "gig" is church - Tomlin, Hillsong, etc. Maybe a precision is the safer bet.
  7. Lowbrow

    Lowbrow Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
  8. SteveC

    SteveC

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Forks, North Dakota
    Videos like this get me going….in more ways than one.



    Maybe this isn't a hollow body. No obvious f holes.
  9. GIBrat51

    GIBrat51

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2013
    Location:
    Lost Wages, Nevada
    First of all, I would recommend playing every hollow- or semi-hollow bass you can get your hands on, before deciding for yourself. I have several hollowbody basses, and a '78 P-Bass. I'm also a lefty, so my choice of, and experience with, HB basses is rather limited. That said, IME, while HBs are not really a One Trick Pony, they're not the most versatile bass around, either. There are semi-hollow basses that are more useful, tone-wise (although my only semi is a Danelectro DC, and it sounds like... well, a Danelectro). Much as I like my HBs, I have to say that , if you want diversity, my recommendation would be the P-Bass. :)
  10. SteveC

    SteveC

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Forks, North Dakota
    Unfortunately, I don't have that option where I live.

    It may be just a passing fancy…they look so cool. I'm thinking that aside from my active 5 string hum bucking Roscoe, a Precision is probably the next most useful bass for me while still offering a change in tone and playing style.
  11. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2004
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    The P-bass is indeed the Swiss Army knife of basses. There is almost nothing it won't do, and there are very few things it can't do quite well.

    I'm a fan of hollows and semi-hollows, but it is a good idea to lay hands on them. With a P-bass you know what you'll get. A change of strings makes a big difference, too.
  12. Session1969

    Session1969 Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Check out a Roadworn P as well. The tone for the vintage p is to die for. A new p would be good as well.
  13. radmin

    radmin Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2006
    Location:
    Columbus, Oh
    I'd go P. I've been experimenting a lot at church lately with my Roscoe. The neck pickup soloed seems to cut through better. My ideal p would be a Sadowsky. Mainly because I go direct and need to be about to tweak my tone easily. If you think passive would work there are lot of Mike Lull p styles that turn my head.

    I went to guitar center last week to try out the Squire->USA Fenders. I didn't like any of them. Their rose wood fingerboards get radiused into practically nothing on the sides. This bothers me for reasons I can't really explain.
  14. Gaolee

    Gaolee The Fat Violin Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    I have a hollow Japanese bass and a semi-hollow EB-2. They are both great, and I would not want to be without them. But, I also have a Precision, and that one gets used a lot more.
  15. SteveC

    SteveC

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Forks, North Dakota
    One thing that I don't think they do well is the contemporary jazz/fusion thing. :meh:

    But I do have my Roscoe for that. :D

    My wife has said many times that it sounds good (I have tried them before for a few days and never thought I sounded as good on one as others) and everyone I listen to (Pino, Bruno, etc) uses one so get one and give it some time - like a year.
  16. jeffbonny

    jeffbonny _____________ Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2000
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    The Epiphone Jack Casady is the P-Bass of semi hollows.
  17. AlexanderB

    AlexanderB

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Sweden
    Ibanez Artcore is a very ggod bass for little money, IMHO. The hollowbody Hagströms are also impressive. Their patented neck design makes for very good tone and almsot zero dead spots, which is often a pronounced issue on hollowbodies, IME.

    Still, in your shoes, I'd get a Precision before exploring the numerous hollowbody designs. Some are not that good for stage use, not even at lower SPL.
  18. Bassisgood4U

    Bassisgood4U

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2014
    Nothing's as diverse as a Precision Bass. They fit in at every gig imaginable.
  19. Gbass75

    Gbass75 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    Location:
    Berkeley, California

    You nailed it with that one, man... my thoughts, exactly.
  20. GIBrat51

    GIBrat51

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2013
    Location:
    Lost Wages, Nevada
    Understand completely. In my case, I probably use one or the other of my HBs slightly more than my P, but that's just because of the kind of music that I like to play. Also, my P is set up to play the Jamerson, Motown thump. I have other basses if I need versatile.. Don't worry; hollowbodys will still be around when you get the urge again. ;)

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