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Preventing Amp Noise During Recording

Discussion in 'Amps [BG]' started by MattGreer, Jan 2, 2014.

  1. MattGreer

    MattGreer

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    I recently picked up a Markbass LMIII and the cooling fan is about as loud as a typical desktop computer. It's pulling quite a bit of air through there, and there is the slightest bearing noise coming from it as well. The mics I use, even dynamic mics, are sensitive enough to pick this noise up.

    I assume that even if I take the head back and exchange it I'm still going to get the same amount of noise, or perhaps worse.

    How do you all deal with cooling fan noise during recording? Perhaps it's lost in the mix as it is slight, but for quiet sections I can't imagine not noticing it.

    Perhaps I'm over-sensitive. If I am, please gently say so. :)

    Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you all. This forum is fantastic.
  2. bassbully

    bassbully Endorsed by The PHALEX CORN BASS..mmm...corn! Supporting Member

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    Run direct? I have no idea but my LMIII was as quiet as a mouse. You might need to get that fan looked at.
  3. B-string

    B-string Supporting Member

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    I use occasionally a LM tube 800 at the keyboardists and never noticed any fan noise. That said you can always sample a dead spot before the program begins as the noise floor sample and apply that as a noise reduction filter.
  4. Downunderwonder

    Downunderwonder

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    Get a PA speaker cable and put the amp outside? If I owned a studio I'd have the room wired with speakons.
  5. Slough Feg Bass

    Slough Feg Bass

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    ^^this^^

    put the amp outside the iso booth.
  6. aledeville

    aledeville

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    Jep... bass players sometimes forget that there are speakon cables longer than 5 feet...
  7. derrico1

    derrico1 Supporting Member

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    Yes. Separate head and cab.

    BTW, sounds like something's wrong with your LMII.
  8. Downunderwonder

    Downunderwonder

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    Probably not a happening thing.

    Maybe put the amp in a box in a box with convection air holes on opposite sides. Should damp the fan noise.
  9. BurningSkies

    BurningSkies

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    My LMII has never been this loud. The fan sound isn't even perceptible.
  10. Downunderwonder

    Downunderwonder

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    That's a case for getting CS to send a new fan unit quicksmart then.
  11. MattGreer

    MattGreer

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    Thanks for the feedback guys. Back to Guitar Center I go, I guess! :)
  12. Interceptor

    Interceptor Supporting Member

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    It all depends on how the engineer is going to mic the cab.

    If the mic ends up within inches - ignore the fan - it won't get heard. If the mic is going to be placed farther away (to add in some room sound) then there are countermeasures; hope it gets buried in the fray, tent the back of the rig with moving blankets, noise gate the mic and finally to to some editing to tamp down the noise. B-String's method also works.

    Personally, I like to get the track to stand on its own two feet. Fixing stuff in post is labor intensive, and not always pretty.

    Yet another reason why I own a Thunderfunk. It has a fan switch.
  13. rekall

    rekall

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    I was having the exact same issue with my Ashdown MAG300

    I decided to open it up and put a switch on the fan.

    If you're not beating the hell out of the amp(high gain) for extended periods of time it will be fine without the fan running especially in an airconditioned room\studio. I also swapped the fan out for a silent pc fan on rubber mounts - this made the fan noise much quieter.

    Disclaimer: The cooling fan is there for a good reason but if you apply common sense then running it without the fan is fine for a limited amount of time.
  14. MattGreer

    MattGreer

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    The engineer would be me, and unfortunately my 30 day return window is over and I don't want to deal with the hassle of swapping one out; they don't stock these things.

    I'll keep the mic close. The room is a fairly dead basement so no need for room micing.

    Thanks again for the feedback folks. Much appreciated.
  15. BassmanPaul

    BassmanPaul Gold Supporting Member

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    Put the amp in another room where it's fan will be inaudible. Run a long speaker cable to your cabinet where the recording mic is. If that's too much hassle, go direct.
  16. Chef

    Chef Moderator Supporting Member

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    Disclosures:
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Genius! I love this!

  17. BassmanPaul

    BassmanPaul Gold Supporting Member

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    Chef, we Grumpy guys ain't just pretty faces tha-knows! :)
  18. B-string

    B-string Supporting Member

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    Even a free program like Audacity will let you sample the noise floor and choose the rate of reduction. Makes a big difference with even gig recordings you find good enough to keep around. :)

    The trouble is keeping what we know from disappearing! :crying:
  19. Chef

    Chef Moderator Supporting Member

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    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Whaaaaaaa?
    Yeah, that's never happening. :)

  20. Major Softie

    Major Softie

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    Naw, it doesn't disappear . . . it's just often difficult to recall where we left it.

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