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Question about a DPDT On/On/On switch in relation to series/parallel switching on a J

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by back as a wolf, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. back as a wolf

    back as a wolf

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    Hey everyone. I have a MIM Jazz bass (2004) that I'm trying to upgrade so I can have the option of running it in series or parallel. I am using the stock pickups and pots that it came with. I have looked up and down and searched all over this forum but absolutely could not find and answer. I have a DPDT on/on/on switch. It was all I could find at the local parts store. How would I be able to wire this to switch between series and parallel wiring? I've read some guys talking about the third "option" being ran as "single coil" or "single" but no one seemed to elaborate on what that meant. Since there are three positions on this switch what would the third option be? Is it even possible to do what I'm trying to do with the part that I have? Sorry guys, just a little frustrated here! Or would I just be better off saving myself the headache and using a push/pull pot for series/parallel switching...?? Answers and/or diagrams are HIGHLY appreciated.. thanks so much guys!! :hyper:
  2. line6man

    line6man

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    Series/single coil/parallel switching is for non-split coil humbuckers. You are doing series/parallel switching relative to two pickup, rather than two coils in one pickup. If you have a SP3T switch, and choose to wire it in the standard fashion for series/parallel on a Jazz bass, the "single coil" position will solo the neck pickup.
  3. back as a wolf

    back as a wolf

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    Thank you kindly for your quick reply! Is an SP3T switch the same as a DPDT on/on/on switch? Also, do you know what "order" the options would be on the switch relative to the fashion I intend on wiring for series/parallel on a Jazz? I'm going to be using the diagram on this page: http://www.lordgoogle.com/bass/s1_mod/

    Does that seem about right? Also how would I avoid ground loops in this wiring setup (if possible)? Sorry for all the questions!
  4. line6man

    line6man

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    DPDT On/On/On switches are known as SP3T. The switching pattern is like a DPDT On/On switch for the first and third positions, but the second position is split so that one common goes to a NO terminal, and the other common goes to a NC terminal. They are called SP3T, because a SP3T pattern is obtained by externally jumpering two terminals. When left un-jumpered, the split middle position is of use to certain applications, such as series/single coil/parallel pickup coil switching.

    For the diagram linked, the switching will be parallel in the "up" position, neck pickup only in the middle position, and series in the "down" position.

    You cannot create a significant ground loop in a bass, because there is only one ground. If you are reading about ground loops somewhere, it's either nonsense, or intended for a different application than musical instruments.
  5. back as a wolf

    back as a wolf

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    Thank you! Yeah, I've been reading some stuff on these forums regarding ground loops within wiring a bass and some people seem to treat them as if they are the devil. I never understood why. I spent a long time studying the Jazz shielding pictorial that I believe is sticky'd in the pickup/electronics sub forum and I figured the general consensus was that ground loops generated more noise and interference. I didn't realize that they were not as big a deal as people were making them out to be.

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