Recommend me an entry level DLSR camera

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Papersen, Mar 22, 2014.


  1. Papersen

    Papersen Gold Supporting Member

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    Mar 22, 2002
    I´ve owned a Canon S3 for 8 years now and it´s time to change it. I´ll be visiting B&H in NYC later this year and wanna narrow my option for a sub $1000 camera.

    What models do you recommend ? Thanks.
     
  2. IPA

    IPA

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    May 5, 2010
    I love my T2i. If It got stolen or destroyed by rabid ferrets, I would probably grab a T3i.
     
  3. f.c.geil

    f.c.geil I'm your huckleberry... Supporting Member

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    I'd look at a Rebel since you are used to Canon. Okay, I'd suggest one, any way. I'm a Canon shooter, and always have been. With that being said, Canon have better sensors and higher image quality (Nikon have better AF).
     
  4. Papersen

    Papersen Gold Supporting Member

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    Mar 22, 2002
    Thanks.
    I´m used to "Point and shoot" cameras so my photo skills are still entry/mid level.
     
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  6. IPA

    IPA

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    May 5, 2010
    Don't be ashamed of shooting auto. I know it's some sort of 'badge of honor' to shoot fully manual, but whatever.

    And FWIW, I like Canon's auto mode and focus points and all of that. I'm in auto on my T2i the majority of the time.
     
  7. lakefx

    lakefx Supporting Member

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    The most important piece of equipment in the photo chain is the lens. Do your homework on lenses, pick a good one or two to start and have a plan of what you want to shoot and what lenses will best facilitate that. Then pick what body you want based on the lenses.

    When I went through the process, I ended up with Nikon because there were more good lenses available on the used market. That was about 6 years ago, so it may have changed.

    The bodies lose value fairly quickly as new technology is introduced, but the lenses sell used for more than half the new price for a very long time because they don't really go obsolete. That's why it's more important to focus on getting the right glass.
     
  8. lakefx

    lakefx Supporting Member

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    This is actually no longer true. Nikon has the best sensors on the market right now and Canon's new focus system promises to be a game changer.

    Edit: realized that I should clarify the sensor statement. Nikon uses sensors manufactured by Sony and Toshiba and they are way ahead of Canon right now. Sony probably has the best sensors out now, but if you want a DSLR and not a mirrorless camera the Sonys are ridiculously expensive.
     
  9. matante

    matante

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    Depending on what type of photos you make, an SLR may not be the best option.

    If you do need an SLR, consider going with a full-frame, especially if you need or want to use good wide angle lenses. You can get a used Canon 5D for about $600.

    I highly recommend you buy used. Depending on how big you want to print, something like a Nikon D90 could be all you need, and that would cost less than $400 without a lens (used).
     
  10. f.c.geil

    f.c.geil I'm your huckleberry... Supporting Member

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    As a working professional photographer, I am going to politely disagree with you. I haved owned several Nikons (they keep giving them to me, trying to get me to switch), currently have a D4s on loan. They simply aren't the imaging machines Canon are (although they seem to be more durable and forgiving of abuse). Nikon has a higher megapixel count, but that is (generally) the very thing that prevents image quality. Megapixel counts have been far higher than anyone but billboard shooters need for years now, so any DSLR is ample in that regard. Look at things like micron size of individual pixels, sharpness (or lack thereof if you shoot portraits), edge contrast, D-Max, color (bit) density, color accuracy, etc. Canon and Nikon have always been close, but while Nikon made (slightly) better film cameras, Canon make better DSLRs.

    Matante is absolutely right. OP, you may be happier with an ILC or other type of camera. What are you looking to do with the camera?
     
  11. Papersen

    Papersen Gold Supporting Member

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    Mar 22, 2002
    Thanks for all your answers.

    I generally use my camara in different situations:
    Indoor shooting like family events, rehearsals, gigs and bass pictures (I keep pics of all my basses)

    Outdoor for landscapes and use it a lot while travelling.
    Since I also wanna improve my skills, I plan to expand my artistic knowledge too.
     
  12. iamlowsound

    iamlowsound

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    Listowel/KW Ontario
    I really dig my T3i. The stock lens is quite good for entry level stuff. I picked it up for ~$350 on Boxing Day.

    lowsound
     
  13. Papersen

    Papersen Gold Supporting Member

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    Mar 22, 2002
    It´s funny since I´ve always bought used basses, but didn´t consider that option with Cameras.

    Where do you suggest searching for used cameras/lenses?

    Thanks again for your input guys.
     
  14. f.c.geil

    f.c.geil I'm your huckleberry... Supporting Member

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    Adorama, Calumet, and especially B&H Photo Video are all reputable companies with extensive used inventories. There is nothing wrong with buying a used body, but I would hesitate to get used glass. However, using one of the above gives you return options if an item is not up to your standards.
     
  15. tplyons

    tplyons

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    Madison, NJ
    I'd recommend a Canon T3i kit with the 18-55mm IS II lens. The lens is decent; but the image stabilization is nice and it will get you up and running with a good body and the kit can be had for $599.

    Once you get up and running I'd recommend buying a Canon 50mm f/1.8 lens (better known as the Nifty Fifty or Plastic Fantastic) which goes for around $125 and is a phenomenal (and fairly quick) lens... can't be beat for the price.

    When I started with my DSLR, I was using a 20D and 18-55mm lens (without IS) and 50mm f/1.8. I've since added a few pieces of glass, but I still use the 50mm f/1.8 all the time. I've since upgraded my body to a 60D but am still using the glass from my 20D.

    Just keep in mind, once you go down the DSLR path, it's in your best interest to stick with one manufacturer. Buy a camera based on the glass, not the body. Bodies will be updated every year by the manufacturer, but many lenses are out there for YEARS and YEARS.
     
  16. lakefx

    lakefx Supporting Member

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    Without getting into a Nikon vs Canon debate, which is about as productive as a jazz vs P-bass debate, I think you may find things a bit different in bottom end of the price range. Even if I'm wrong, you probably agree that the lenses are more important anyway and both have excellent lens options. Both also make great images and there are lots of top pros using either system. My point was more that things change and buying into a system is about a lot more than which has better sensors or auto focus at the moment.
     
  17. iamlowsound

    iamlowsound

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    Where did you find the 50 for that cheap? I have been looking for a fast prime in that focal range and have struck out so far.

    lowsound
     
  18. tplyons

    tplyons

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    Even better, $99 on Amazon.

    http://www.amazon.com/Canon-50mm-1-...qid=1395593990&sr=8-1&keywords=canon 50mm 1.8

    Every Canon shooter I know has one... even my professional friend who carries her 50mm f/1.2. She keeps the f/1.8 in the car as a backup.
     
  19. matante

    matante

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    From this I gather that you don't need longer focal lengths and you'll get better pics without a flash. You want something with good image quality at higher ISOs.

    You could go with a used Canon 5D and spend the other $400 on a used 28mm 1.8 lens.

    But I would consider a Fujfilm XE-1 (it's recently been replaced) and it's kit lens for starters. It goes for about $800 brand new right now. That thing is small enough for you to enjoy taking it with you to these events and it will work great without flash.
     
  20. lakefx

    lakefx Supporting Member

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    I almost sold my DSLR setup for a Fuji XE-1 last year. I love the small size and the image quality is good enough for me. What stopped me was the lens choices. I shoot mostly wide angle landscapes, low light sports, and wildlife with a long zoom. The Fuji lenses would be great for the low light sports, but their really wide angle options are super pricey and they don't really offer anything for wildlife.
     
  21. i_got_a_mohawk

    i_got_a_mohawk

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    Be sure to try it out first, I was set on getting a Canon 550D (Rebel T2i in the US) but it was simply too small in hand. Ended up spending a bit more and getting the 60D.
     

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