Refinishing a bass

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Precision345, Jun 24, 2013.


  1. Precision345

    Precision345 Supporting Member

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    Hi,
    I am working on refinishing my Peavey Zodiac and need some help.

    So far I have stripped the paint and have done a basic sanding from 100 up to 200 on the body to smooth it out. I need to fix some of the gouges and dents before I can primer it for paint.

    Does anyone know how I should go about this? Grain filler followed by sanding? Also, I am wondering what I should use for primer? I have a basic grey primer that I have used for pedal enclosures but I'm not sure if it will be appropriate for wood. I believe it is just an enamel based primer. How many coats will i need to apply? I plan on painting the guitar a black and gold swirl once it's ready for paint.

    Finally, where can I get a polyurethane laquer for finishing and how many coats do I need before sanding, buffing?

    Any help would be much appreciated!
     

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  2. skred

    skred

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    You can try the old woodworker's trick: place a small piece of fairly thick dampened cloth over the dent, and apply a small soldering iron to the cloth. Principle is that the steam will swell the wood grain and raise it. If it works, you lightly sand the raised area back to level....
     
  3. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    Is the gray primer compatible with the finish you are using? If so it would work just fine. I use automotive grey primer on most solid color finishes.

    About the dents and gouges. You could just spray a sealer coat then fill them with bondo, sand them level and spray another coat of primer.
     
  4. Precision345

    Precision345 Supporting Member

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    Thanks guys. The paint I will be using for the finish will be an oil based enamel. The primer is an enamel as well but I'm not sure if oil based? I don't know much about paint so im not sure if it would be compatible.
     
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  6. JIO

    JIO Gold Supporting Member

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    Yes, enamel used to mean only thinner-based but no more. In fact, even the term alkyd is no longer only thinner-based. (both now used in the acrylic world as well) I'm a professional painter and I'm continually caught wondering what's compatible these days. I can safely say that when I use thinner based 'sanding sealer" on new wood - I can use it both as a sealer and as a leveler (for eliminating grain) without fear. Many coats, sanding between coats - final product an excellent base for what's next. Here in CA, it gets harder every day to buy the tried and true products I've counted on. Not complaining in terms of reducing toxins - but for example, "Simple Green" has never impressed me compared to "409" as an effective grease-cutting cleaner. And don't get me started about the pathetic version of "paint stripper" we have to use here. :rollno:

    So in general, as long as the finish product does not attack the under-coat product, you're good. For the record, enamel is soft and will never really get as hard and durable as the poly-resins used commercially today. Lacquer is more demanding to work with (specific cure time once done spraying) but can offer much more flexibility as far as layering/buffing etc. My advice (up to you to accept it or not) is: keep it thin, keep it clean & smooth through the process, make sure the temps are moderate, the humidity and wind low (if spraying outsides) and keep your spraying ventilated. (for your own well being)

    Good luck!
     
  7. Precision345

    Precision345 Supporting Member

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    Thanks! I thought I should mention that im going to be using all hand tools
     
  8. JIO

    JIO Gold Supporting Member

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    ... all the better (just like playing bass) - more control, no "chatter" (swirl-scratches) and your fingers will inform you when you are there.

    Black and gold swirl? I'm very interested to see what you do here...
     
  9. Precision345

    Precision345 Supporting Member

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    It's going to be awhile before I paint her yet. I'll be sure to post pictures once I do. Should I be using a gold colored primer since gold is pretty much going to be my base color?

    Here's a pic of a wah pedal I swirled to give you an idea of what effect I'm going for
     

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  10. JIO

    JIO Gold Supporting Member

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    hummm.., all depends on the technique you'll be using. (dipping in a vat?) Usually I'd say a light or white base is best to maximize the reflective quality of the gold (metallic?) but then there's the black... so maybe gold. Gold paint (paint w/metallic ingredients) is only a version of what 'gold' can be, and is usually visually subdued. (for lack of a better way of saying it) I've never done the swirl-thing so tests are probably your best tact before the guitar goes in. Please post step-by's to enlighten us.
     
  11. Precision345

    Precision345 Supporting Member

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    Sure, thanks for your help.
     

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