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Saddle adjustment screw question

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Gorn Captain, Feb 19, 2014.


  1. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens
    Question: The left-side adjustment screw on the E string saddle is stuck and the hole is stripped. I tried flipping it over and turning the screw with plyers from the bottom but it seems stuck. The others all turn freely. It's strange cuz the others all rusted and the one that doesn't turn isn't. So I can't lower that side of the saddle. Any ideas?
    This isn't a picture of mine but it shows the screw I'm talking about.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2004
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    I suppose you could soak it overnight with a few drops of a good penetrating oil and try again. If the correct hex key in the top recess won't turn it, then it is indeed stuck.

    It appears to be a standard Fender-type bridge; you could replace the saddles pretty easily.
     
  3. Lownote38

    Lownote38

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2013
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    Someone probably cross threaded it, or put the wrong size screw in there. Soak it in oil (as mentioned above) and see if that loosens it up.
     
  4. macmanlou

    macmanlou Don't push it. Just let it fall. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Location:
    Washington, DC Area
    In over 40 years of experience twisting wrenches, I've found that PB Blaster is the best penetrating oil out there. You can find it at better auto parts stores, Amazon, Walmart, etc. Just be careful not to get it on any painted finishes you care about, or in your eyes.

    If the screw is cross threaded (or the wrong size or thread), penetrating oil isn't going to help much at all. If that's the case and you don't want to replace the saddle, you could flip it over and carefully file the screw down until it's the desired height.
     
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  6. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens
    I appreciate the input gentlemen. What would I use to sand down the bottom of the screw?
     
  7. E.J. T.N.T.

    E.J. T.N.T.

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2005
    Location:
    Berlin, Germany
    My advice would be to heat the saddle with a soldering iron so that it expands a bit.
     
  8. okcrum

    okcrum in your chest Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Media:
    2
    Location:
    Verde Valley, AZ
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: Dark Horse strings
    A file.
     
  9. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens
    Thanks. So a file and not a banana?

    I was wondering if there's a specific type of file that works best.
     
  10. macmanlou

    macmanlou Don't push it. Just let it fall. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Location:
    Washington, DC Area
    Any small flat file for metal would work. I'd probably choose a variable speed Dremel tool with a grinder tip. Take a little off at a time and recheck often.

    You might want to take the saddle off and hold it in a bench vise. If not, a c-clamp and some rags to prevent damaging anything else would be a good idea.
     
  11. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens
    I'll try that. Thanks.
     

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