Sandberg P bass with a jazz neck?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by terribilino, Mar 15, 2014.


  1. terribilino

    terribilino

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    Hadn't been on the Sandberg site for a while, and I noticed they've added a configurator: http://www.configurator.sandberg-guitars.de/.


    Under 'neck' there is sadly no option for jazz/p-bass neck (which in Sandberg-speak would be T-bass/V-bass respectively). Has anyone ever heard of a Sandberg P-bass (ie. V-bass) with a jazz neck (ie. T-neck)? That would be my dream configuration, but the configurator doesn't seem to offer that...
     
  2. Hamlet7768

    Hamlet7768 Here to chew gum and rock. Still have gum.

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    Configurator also doesn't offer a 6-string Basic, which is MY dream configuration, but they have a picture of one in the gallery for the Basic. I'd be willing to bet the configurator isn't everything they can do.
     
  3. terribilino

    terribilino

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    Then there's hope!
     
  4. precijazz

    precijazz I want a name when I lose. Supporting Member

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    My TT4 and VM4 have the same neck, and it's not a P neck. Didn't order them that way, bought them off the shelf from my local music store. AFAIK that's the way they do them by default.

    Great neck, BTW. Slim, but not too thin from front to back. Large fretboard radius, but not completely flat. I do like old school P necks as well, but the VM4 is far from old school, so the "faster" neck is a perfect fit.
     
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  6. terribilino

    terribilino

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    Whoa! I knew P-basses came with different sized necks, but I just assumed that a jazz knock-off would have a jazz neck.

    So there's no difference in the nut-width between a T-bass and a V-bass. I guess that would be why they don't give you the option ...

    Do you know what the nut width is on your basses? Nut width is the one spec I can't find on the site. I've got a Highway One p-bass with a 1.625' (41.2 mm) nut width, but I was gassing for a plain vanilla Sandberg p-bass with a narrower neck.
     
  7. terribilino

    terribilino

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    I think I might have found it on another site: 38.75mm for a JM4.

    Can anyone confirm that 38.75mm is the standard nut width for a Sandberg 4-string P-bass (ie. V-bass).

    Thanks!
     
  8. precijazz

    precijazz I want a name when I lose. Supporting Member

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    Not sure about the .75, but between 38 and 39 it is.
     
  9. grayn

    grayn

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    The Panther is pretty much a P-body with a J-neck.
     
  10. VifferMike

    VifferMike Registered Four Banger Supporting Member

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    Nut width (or, more accurately: zero fret width) on my Basic Ken Taylor 4 is also 39.75mm. I'm reasonably certain that Sandberg nut widths and necks are, with few exceptions, the same across the model range.

    Here's the thing, though: nut width does not always mean the same string width at the nut. I have three basses with 24-fret rosewood-board necks with zero frets and relatively flat radiuses: the BKT4, an Elrick Expat NJS 4, and a '93 Status Energy 4. Nut/zero fret width on the Elrick is 43mm; on the Status, it's 42.5mm. Yet the string spacing at the zero fret on the Sandberg and Elrick is exactly the same -- 11.25mm -- and on the Status it's wider: 12mm. The kicker is that the Status is 18mm at the bridge, while the Elrick is 19mm, and the Sandberg is variable/adjustable string to string (18.5-19.5mm).

    All that says is that there are a lot more variables to consider than just raw nut width in determining how comfortable a neck is for you.

    (Side note on the Sandberg: its adjustable string-width bridge is probably the biggest reason Sandberg necks are uniform across the range; it's more cost-effective to design in adjustability there than it is in neck profiles, especially when the necks are hand-finished.)
     
  11. terribilino

    terribilino

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    Great info - lots of food for thought.

    Thanks all! I'm off to save some money...
     

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