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Self Taught Right Hand

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Andrew B., Dec 7, 2013.

  1. Andrew B.

    Andrew B. Supporting Member

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    I was a self-taught and it was not until recently that I started reading about technique. I had never thought about where my right hand should be. But now I'm looking at beginner lessons to see how many bad habits I have.

    I notice that I never rest my thumb on a string. The ball of my palm rests very lightly on the bass, and moves easily up and down as needed. Sometimes it's more my lower arm that is touching the upper edge of the bass body, and my hand is floating.

    I have big hands, so the strings are always within easy reach. I move my hand because it just seems to work more easily this way. Also, I converted to bass from being a guitar finger-picker, and maybe that affected some of this.

    I'm going to try what the teachers are teaching. But I'm wondering if what I do is recommended by anyone.
  2. Kmonk

    Kmonk

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    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: Fender and Spector, Ampeg, Curt Mangan Strings
    I'm all for learning new techniques but at the same time, we all have different bodies and what works for one person might not work for another. I am completely self taught and get a lot of compliments on my tone and technique. My right hand moves around depending on the song and the type of sound I want. Explore other techniques, find what works best for you and stick with it.
  3. Andrew B.

    Andrew B. Supporting Member

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    Good advice. Thanks.
  4. fearceol

    fearceol

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    There are no hard and fast rules and it is up to each person to find a technique that suits them. Having said that, some techniques can cause injury over time. It is generally accepted that to avoid potential injuries, both wrists should be as straight as possible. There is a great technique called "The Floating Thumb" (see link below). You say your hand floats, so you are probably using a similar type technique.

    Here is a link for safe right hand technique :

  5. Andrew B.

    Andrew B. Supporting Member

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    Thanks. I had wondered how to keep the wrist straighter. He has some good stuff there.

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