Shopping for a bicycle... too much like shopping for a bass.

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by IPA, Mar 26, 2014.


  1. IPA

    IPA

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    Perhaps it isn't exclusive of the two, but just the way that all gear-based hobbies are.

    You could pretty much swap out the word bass for bike for so many of the statements. Right down to the "everything made in China is crap" to "China is really putting out some surprisingly good stuff these days"

    You can go to 3 different stores and get 3 different sets of opinions.

    And the gear judging, seems to be just the same. Forum jockeys that probably spend more time typing than riding/playing are the ones who judge and deem all imports to be garbage, the ones who love to ride/play love that you love it and don't care what your rig looks like.

    Anyway... I have a bike now. :)
     
  2. elgecko

    elgecko

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    No pic, no bike!
     
  3. IPA

    IPA

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    Tomorrow I'll get a pic! It's just a brownish colored road bike, so don't get too excited.
     
  4. DerHoggz

    DerHoggz I like cats :| Banned

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    Well pretty much everything under like 7k is made in China (actually Taiwan), and a lot of it is very good. Within a segment there isn't too much difference between most manufacturers honestly.
     
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  6. Roscoe East

    Roscoe East

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    ^^^This. My non-cycling friends who know I'm a cyclist are always asking me for advise on what bike to buy for them or their kids, and unless I sense that they're about to step completely over to the Dark Side and become an obsessive over-the-top hobbyist like me, I always tell them

    "Giant, Trek, Cannondale, or Specialized...everything they make is perfectly respectable by today's standards and infinitely better than anything you could find 20 years ago. If it fits you it'll be a great bike

    ...and there's no appreciable difference between any of those brands."
     
  7. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member

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    Another parallel: Buy used, if you know how to swing a wrench.
     
  8. IPA

    IPA

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    This is the general feeling I was getting. And it sure does sound a bit like basses, too.

    I'm just a fat old goober getting back into riding, a cheap bike is good for now. I just want to have fun! Plus with the way bikes disappear and get stolen in these parts, I'm not about to lock a $1500 bike up only to see it vanish :bawl:
     
  9. DerHoggz

    DerHoggz I like cats :| Banned

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    Watch out or pretty soon you'll be eyeing $1500 wheels.
     
  10. IPA

    IPA

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    I don't doubt that, not at all. Bikes are as sexy as basses, too. Looking at all the shiny stuff in the store is tempting. And that slippery slope of justifying spending the money, it's easier when it's in the name of fitness!
     
  11. fokof

    fokof One day ,I'll be in the future Gold Supporting Member

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    Yep :smug:

    As much as bass players are listening with their eyes or their VISA cards , same goes for the cycling world.

    And no , you don't have to absolutely have the 700 or 650 MTB wheels. Or the new wheel size they are gonna market next year….. :rollno:
     
  12. Jim Nazium

    Jim Nazium

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    ... and if you chuckle every time someone asks "how much does it weigh?" in the TB classifieds, go browse a cycling forum. "This saddle was advertised as 190 grams but I weighed it at 203 grams! :crying:"
     
  13. elgecko

    elgecko

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    "Sure. These pedals cost $170 more, but they'll save me 32 grams!"
     
  14. DerHoggz

    DerHoggz I like cats :| Banned

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    I have stainless Speedplays... Was going to get CrMo, but they were all that was available on a race weekend after I had broken my other pedals. These ones are 4 grams lighter for the whole package!
     
  15. biobass

    biobass Supporting Member

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    I highly recommend reading "Just Ride" by Grant Petersen, the owner and founder of Rivendell Bicycle Works. He makes a lot of important points for the recreational rider, which is a category most of us will fall into – The Unracer. It is a quick read, but chock full of good information, a lot of it touching on the philosophy of bike riding for us, the non-professionals.

    Good luck to you being back in the saddle again!
     
  16. SnowCal

    SnowCal

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    Or for a more utilitarian streak check out Sheldon Brown's site. Lots of good info there for somebody who just wants to ride and isn't deadset on becoming a pro racer or tackling hardcore MTB trails. AKA: What most of us use a bike for.

    One shame about the bike market in America is that it's really targeted at recreational extremes. Road bikes that sacrifice as much comfort as possible to eek out that 0.001mph advantage that will win the race, or MTBs that slaughter efficiency in the name of control. CX bikes make some compromises that provide versatility but the fits are often awkward. Hybrids do well but the flat handlebars aren't actually a positive for comfort over drops. Manufacturers are getting better but it'd be nice if the market for versatile, comfortable bikes was bigger.
     
  17. DerHoggz

    DerHoggz I like cats :| Banned

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    As someone who needs an aggressive position, I find a lot of "race" bikes don't accommodate it, there seems to be a watering down going on for a lot of them. Headtubes that can double as flagpoles and such.
     
  18. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member

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    +1 for Sheldon Brown.

    And who ever came up with those flat bars. They pound the hell out of my wrists, even on pavement. And I no longer find drops comfortable either, so I've switched to bars like these:

    [​IMG]
     
  19. IPA

    IPA

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    Ultimately after reading and toying with different budgets, I said "screw it" and got a cheap, basic bike and stopped wasting time. Too many decisions. I probably won't notice the difference at my level. I'd rather be riding!

    My legs are really sore tonight. I'll be lucky to be able to walk tomorrow.:)
     
  20. Roscoe East

    Roscoe East

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    While I don't disagree that Petersen's book makes some very valid points and is a worthwhile read, I'm routinely disappointed that he paints recreational cyclists as one of two extremes without acknowledging the very significant gray area between them:

    There is a vast segment of the recreational cycling population who are not racers but who do still require a more performance-oriented bicycle than the touring/toodling-oriented road bikes that Petersen insists we should all be riding. Yes, many of them are racer-wannabees (aka "Cat6") and yes, a lot of the people who walk into the LBS probably should be pointed towards a Rivendell A. Homer Hinson rather than an S-Works Tarmac SL4...but Petersen continually preaching this notion that recreational riders don't need race geometry and tour-proven components ignores the fact that lots of cyclists actually have fun challenging themselves and riding competitively.
     
  21. MTBK

    MTBK

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    I've been an avid mountain biker (hence the name MTBK) for about 15 years now. I actually raced from 15 until I was 22 making it into Mens Pro categories and competing regionally.

    With biking you have to replace broken or worn out parts often, depending on how you abuse your bike. However with bass it feels like it's much easier to make impulse purchases that aren't always necessary. You can subjectively justify purchases because of tone chasing. And other necessities such as an appropriate rig for your playing situations. Pedals to get the sound you want. I find myself making unnecessary bass purchases so much more easily than bike ones.

    I keep my bike purchasing under control by only upgrading when something breaks and can't be fixed.

    For hobbyist cycling and weekend warrioring there's not much reason to mull over purchases imo. Go to a real bike shop and just get something there. It's all good gear. Any of the reputable brands are going to be good. And obviously when you go cheaper you get cheaper components that won't last as long. Mid-level components are fine for a hobbyist. You don't need XTR or whatever the top tier gear is. Get the best you can afford and hit the trail/road.

    It seems like in my area it's more of a hobby for people that are 30+ years old trying to get back into shape. Which is why I don't know many people who ride because I'm just now getting to 29. I don't like their group/social rides because they're always slow. I know it's not a healthy mentality but when I go to a bike shop and see a guy who doesn't even have a tan dropping mad money on bike parts it just seems wrong. Because I never ever see them at any of the local trails. And the one time I do I manage to lap them two or three times in one afternoon. I think some people throw money at their bikes because it makes them feel like they've made progress with this hobby. Or because it's a distraction from their personal fitness level. Sorry for the mini-rant! I'm sure I'll eat some trail dirt soon for saying that.

    On the bright side I like getting their barely used gear for cheap occasionally.
     

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