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Smoother tone without flat

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by friedtransistor, Dec 10, 2013.

  1. friedtransistor

    friedtransistor

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    Dec 9, 2013
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    I am trying to get a warmer tone out of my bass without switching to flatwound strings. I still want to be able to get full tone when opened up, though. Here's what I've got so far:
    Ibanez (I think it's a gsr100mb, not sure. Says GIO Ibanez Soungear on the headstock, and has only two knobs.)
    P90 split coil pickup(?)
    A250K tone pot with 2 0.1u caps parallel going to ground (0.2u equiv.)
    Lug 1 to white wire from pickup, lug 2 to caps.
    B250K volume pot, lug 1 to white pickup wire/lug 1 of tone pot.
    Lug 2 to output jack tip.
    Lug 3 to ground.
    Black pickup wire to ground.
    Wire from bridge to ground.
    Output jack sleeve is ground.

    Is there anything I could do to increase warmth with the tone pot clockwise while retaining full clarity counterclockwise? Oh, and what could I change to get rid of the buzzing with the tone ccw? It stops whenever I touch any part of ground or the strings. Really annoying to sound like a powerplant whenever I take my hands off the strings.

    Btw, I can't change the settings on my amp without it sounding like a pile of dead •^*+. Don't want to add bass, just cut treble. Oh, and I forgot to mention, I'm using five month old prosteels. Very clanky stuff. I likes, just not 24/7. Only 23/7.
  2. DiabolusInMusic

    DiabolusInMusic Functionless Art is Merely Tolerated Vandalism Supporting Member

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    The buzzing is a shielding issue, give the bass a proper shielding job and the buzz will stop.

    I cannot help with your other inquiries, sorry. I personally had a hard time getting any tones I like out of a Gio, but that is just my preference.
  3. friedtransistor

    friedtransistor

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    How do I go about shielding? Just glue a sheet of aluminum foil to the cover and run a ground wire to it?

    You have a gio, too? Two knobs? I am dying to find out more about my bass since I don't have the SN sticker (dumb to use a sticker, but oh well), and I have only found two results on google about it. One is just a picture of it, and the other have has a fuzzy picture and a vague description of it. I saw my bass in a Guitar Center catalogue a few weeks ago, and it said it was a gsr90 p bass. A lengthy google search came up with nothing, as if that model doesn't even exist.
  4. DiabolusInMusic

    DiabolusInMusic Functionless Art is Merely Tolerated Vandalism Supporting Member

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  5. ctmullins

    ctmullins Registered 8er Supporting Member

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    You want a warmer tone, and you're playing ProSteels? That's easy - string change. You don't have to go all the way to flats; there's a whole continuum of tone available through string selection. Standard nickel roundwounds will add a bit of warmth while maintaining most of the sizzle. D'Addario XLs are cheap, readily available, pretty consistent, and have a good middle-of-the-road tone. Or you might try Thomastik Jazz Rounds for something a bit earthier. Others will have lots of other suggestions for strings as well; hang out in the Strings forum a bit, or do a quick search.
  6. friedtransistor

    friedtransistor

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    Thank you, but I did mention without flats. I hardly want a warm tone, so I can't justify the cost of flats, plus since I play in church, I can't just change my strings on a whim. Some songs needs the piano-like tones, but a few are more jazzy sounding (mix-wise). I want to just be able to turn my tone knob to switch through the entire range, and still retain subtle changes. Until I get enough money to make my 10-band eq, I was hoping some simple wiring trick would work for now.


    edit:
    Thomastik Flats?! You crazy? I could hardly afford prosteels at $25! Imo no strings should ever cost more than $15, let alone $70 for a one-trick pony.

    edit:
    Oops, sorry, you said rounds. Nvm mind then. But what I said still holds true.

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