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Steinberger DB bridge?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by 6stringvince, Dec 15, 2013.


  1. 6stringvince

    6stringvince

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    Location:
    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    I'm planning a headless bass build and considering this bridge, just wondering if anyone has any opinions on it. Concerns are reliability, function, and easy of install (looks like there's some routing involved)
    http://www.headlessusa.com/4-string-bridge-db.htm.
    Any other comparable options that won't brake the bank?
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. grendle

    grendle

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2011
    Location:
    Central FL
    Solid piece by Steinberger, lots of mass there ( good IMO). The hold up well over. Do get a spare thumb screw and spare string jaw for if you ever need it. Never had a failure personally but see n one on that style bridge (broken jaw piece). The piece could have been off a hohner piece wich I believe were cast pieces. Tuning is dead accurate and holds well. Loved my Berger and hohner.

    Status has some great and very different headless bridges also. Don't know if they sell them.

    Maybe kubicki too. Wicked routing but the coolest of the bunch by far.
     
  3. 6stringvince

    6stringvince

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    Location:
    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Good to know, the routing doesn't look to bad.
    Any of the single string bridges look the easiest to install, but the prices are a bit on the crazy side. Also I like the Steinberger detuning system.
     
  4. F-Clef-Jef

    F-Clef-Jef

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Location:
    Neenah, WI
    Do note that there are no intonation adjustment screws on those bridges. That is typical of the "Spirit" line of Steinbergers. They do still lock from the side with a set screw, but adjusting them can be a little touchy. (you can see the set screw hole in pic 1 of 3)
     
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  6. 6stringvince

    6stringvince

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    Location:
    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    So you can adjust but not easily? Is there ample room for this adjustment?
     
  7. 6stringvince

    6stringvince

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    Location:
    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
  8. F-Clef-Jef

    F-Clef-Jef

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Location:
    Neenah, WI
    Yes, they still adjust just fine, but it's by hand...
    It's a bit fidgity to get everything intonated correctly. Theoretically, you have infinite travel, as the saddles are free to roam. If the bass is unstrung and you loosen the set screw on the side, the saddles can fall off the bridge completely, as there is nothing holding them in the bridge at that point.
    Not to say the bridge isn't any good, they are pretty nice actually. Just an observation I made when comparing a Spirit Steinberger to an older USA made Steinberger. (Those bridges are amazing, if you can find one) The Hipshot stuff looks pretty good, but it's nearly twice the cost as the Headless USA system.
     
  9. grendle

    grendle

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2011
    Location:
    Central FL
    its the same as the spector bridges. actually the easiest to set up intonation on imo. and only takes a few min once your used to it. the lock screw holds it all together. After using them, going back to a std type bridge is a PITA.
     
  10. Be_eM

    Be_eM

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2013
    Location:
    Bavaria, Germany
    No, that's not a "Spirit" thing (while actually meaning: the cheapo version of a Steinberger bridge). Some of the bass bridges had an adjustment screw, but definitely not all. The first L2 bridges didn't have one, the steel bridge made by Schaller (one of the most desirable ones, found on several XLs) didn't have one, and ALL of the guitar bridges (including the $1,000 TransTrem) don't have one.

    Setting the intonation is easy and reliable, though. Just make it a habit to press down an already set saddle with one finger while adjusting the adjacent one. I do this on my guitars as well, always starting on the high and finishing on the low strings. Works like a breeze…

    Bernd
     
  11. 6stringvince

    6stringvince

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    Location:
    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Sounds like good advice
    Thanks
     
  12. F-Clef-Jef

    F-Clef-Jef

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Location:
    Neenah, WI
    I stand corrected! Sorry to have ruffled your feathers, as I meant nothing of the sort! By the way, if you look at the part in the OP's post, it looks exactly like a Steinberger Spirit bass bridge. The intonation screws were incorporated in the bridges beginning with the XL bass bridges in 1984. All kinds of info here
     
  13. Be_eM

    Be_eM

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2013
    Location:
    Bavaria, Germany
    Ooops, nothing like "ruffling my feathers" has happened… you probably misunderstood my posting. Yes, all the bridges (including the R-Trem) sold there are actually the same hardware as used by Hohner and Steinberger on the Sprits. This is correct. I just wanted to point out that the adjustment screw alone is not a quality indicator per se, as quite a number of original (and very desirable) old Steinie bridges came without them :)

    Bernd
     
  14. F-Clef-Jef

    F-Clef-Jef

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Location:
    Neenah, WI
    No problem! I just wanted to point out the feature (or rather, lack of) so the OP wasn't surprised by it. I had a Spirit XZ back in the 90's and was a little disappointed by that bridge (expecting it to be like my 80's Steinberger bridge).

    But, in the end, it is a perfectly functional bridge, and as you pointed out, used on lots of other Steinberger instruments as well.

    One more thing to note is that I believe those more modern HeadlessUSA bridges are a more standard string spacing (.75") where as the older Steinberger bridges were something like 17mm (.66") spacing.
     

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