String Cutting...

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by ZenG, Dec 23, 2013.


  1. ZenG

    ZenG

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2013
    Read on one site that says never cut the silk on the string

    (The tuner end) as if you do the whole string will eventually unravel.


    My strings never had silk on the tuner end of the wire...it just tapered off to a thinner part.

    As long as you cut where the thinner part is and not the outside wrap wire it should be o.k. right?

    When I replaced my strings I cut them exactly to the length the stock old ones were...which left me with about 3 or 4 wraps per tuner.......

    I did not have to cut the outer wrap at any time ...there was enough there to get me past that.

    If you DID cut the outer wrap that would be kaput for the string right?
  2. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens NY
    Most strings have a hexagonal core and are fine if you're cutting the tapered end.

    There's no reason you should ever cut the fat part of the string if you're using the appropriate length strings for your bass.

    With round core strings, you want to crimp the end before cutting to ensure the outer wrap wire doesn't come loose.
  3. tangentmusic

    tangentmusic A figment of our exaggeration Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Way Out West
    The 3 or 4 wraps per tuner you do is good. Cut only the tapered part.
  4. Linnin

    Linnin

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    Location:
    Waynesboro, Virginia
    :mad:Oh Bugger Off! The total idiot that had an excellent video on how to cut bass strings correctly is a complete assmaster. Too Bad.
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  6. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens NY
    ?
  7. Linnin

    Linnin

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    Location:
    Waynesboro, Virginia
    Yeah, I know. He had a superb video on how to cut and wind bass strings. Now it's gone. Sucks.
  8. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens NY
  9. Precision101

    Precision101

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2013
    If I'm using silk strings like rotosounds I never cut. It's too much of a hassle! If I'm using d addarios I try to get 3 wraps around the post. The more posts = more pressure on nut. Cut the thinner part. (taper) if your cutting the thick part.... Your doing something wrong unless you have a short scale bass with long scale strings :D
  10. JehuJava

    JehuJava I endorse myself Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2002
    Location:
    Oakland, CA

    I've never heard this before. What do you mean crimp?
  11. josiah goldfish

    josiah goldfish

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Location:
    E.Sussex UK
    Bend over the tip of the string and flatten it against itself so that the bend is poking into the hole and the sharp end is facing out. This stops silks from unravelling.

    If you think changing slab bass strings is a hassle, try double bass strings!!! Lining up thick gut strings so that they don't bump into the walls, each other or the other pegs is a nightmare. And violins aren't much better
  12. JustForSport

    JustForSport

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    I always 'crimp' round core and flat wound strings by 1st measuring a palm's width past the post, then bending a sharp 90' angle there, then cutting 1/2"- 3/4" past the bend. This length gives plenty to wrap the posts and get a good break angle on the nut. The crimp (as previously stated) keeps the wraps from unwinding.
  13. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens NY
    Also, If I don't have to cut strings at all, I don't. This usually works on Fender style basses with fat, inline tuners.
  14. Itzayana

    Itzayana

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Location:
    Oakland Ca
    For the last 50 years I have cut strings without giving it a single thought and have never had any unravel.
  15. JehuJava

    JehuJava I endorse myself Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2002
    Location:
    Oakland, CA

    Me too. Though I guess I do the crimp thing unknowingly by tucking the end in at a 90 degree angle. I just thought it looks super clean. I didn't realize this was the magic that kept my strings from exploding like a clock spring.
  16. josiah goldfish

    josiah goldfish

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Location:
    E.Sussex UK
    I highly doubt it stops the actual metal strings unravelling, but it keeps the silks from unravelling and causing a mess.
  17. JustForSport

    JustForSport

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    Most flats and round core makers recommend crimping first-
    likely a reason...
  18. WoodyG3

    WoodyG3 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    Yep.

    Yep.


    It's not like they unwind and fall apart or anything. They unwind a slight bit, and this is what can sometimes cause brand new strings to sound dead or lack volume.
  19. Precision101

    Precision101

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2013
    The red silk part on my rotosounds unravels but doesn't effect the tone or key. But there is fuzz from the silk all over my headstock sometimes..

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