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String tree getting popped out by heavy flats

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by shawshank72, Dec 22, 2013.


  1. shawshank72

    shawshank72

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    Anyone had this happen?
    Using the fender 55-105 and i love it.
    Granted the string tree was lesser quality than typical fender style.
    But it had 50-70 on it once and it held.
    Was going to replace neck anyway but now am worried.
     
  2. mrb327

    mrb327 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Location:
    Colorado
    What is this on? I've used the heavy chromes and not had this problem, tension being similar.

    If you are not afraid to mod it a bit, I would suggest using a Stainless steel machine screw, drill though the head stock, and attach with a flat washer and locknut on the back.

    The other option is to us a slightly larger screw than installed and hope it stays.
     
  3. shawshank72

    shawshank72

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    It was just a cheap affinity p bass neck.
    But am looking to replace with maple one.
     
  4. mrb327

    mrb327 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Location:
    Colorado
    For now try the larger screw.

    Does the new (sexy) maple neck come with hardware?

    Reason I ask is because I've never had one do this, maybe its just the screw was cheap from the factory. The 55-110s I had on my Sqiure were good to go, no pooping out...
     
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  6. shawshank72

    shawshank72

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    Still searching for it. But will try the bigger size screw for now.
     
  7. Jammin Johneboy

    Jammin Johneboy

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2011
    Location:
    near Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    Another thing you might try is filling the screw hole with white glue like Elmers or LePages or even the yellow type carpenters glue. Use a toothpick to push the glue in and completely fill the hole . It will basically turn into a hardened liquid plastic filler . Leave it for 24 hours or more and then put the screw back in . White glues and also the yellow carpenter's glues are water soluble so any glue that gets on the outside can be wiped off with a wet or damp rag . Wipe off any excess glue right after filling the hole. Before putting the screw back in you should drill a pilot hole just one drill size smaller than the core of the screw (called the minor diameter of the screw, thread valley to thread valley). Wrap a piece of tape around the drill bit to mark how deep to drill so you don't accidently drill right through the headstock.

    mrb327's idea of drilling right through and installing a machine screw , washer and lock nut (or Loctite on the threads to prevent loosening) would provide the most solid fix if you don't mind the modification.
     
  8. mrb327

    mrb327 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ah, good catch. I have done this, only I use Superglue. Be extremely careful if you do for the aforementioned reasons.

    Having said that, it is a good way to fix screw holes.


    Maple necks can be had used, they just dont seem to show up as often. I know, looking for the right one myself to switch my J neck to a Precision...maybe I have one for sale :)
     
  9. shawshank72

    shawshank72

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    Thank you for that. Easy fix
     
  10. shawshank72

    shawshank72

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    I like maple jazz necks ;)
    If it would fit and was on cheap side i of course would be interested.
     
  11. 96tbird

    96tbird This Indian movie is really boring man.

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Location:
    Manitoba, Canada
    Picks and glue. Screw it in while the glue is wet. Forces into all nooks and casts a threaded plug once cured. Leave overnight before re-stringing. Extremely string repair.
     
  12. HeavyRockBasser

    HeavyRockBasser

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2009
    Location:
    Long Beach, Ca.
    Aside from the repair, you might try getting some more string wraps around your posts. The string should be coming off the post just above the bushing. If you're coming off high, it's going to place more tension on the string tree/retainer.
     

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