Study/books/DVD suggestions for

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Drew617, Mar 10, 2014.


  1. Drew617

    Drew617

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2014
    Location:
    Watertown, MA
    Hi,

    I'm new here - second post. I've lurked and gleaned a bunch (thanks!) and finally decided to register.

    I'm looking for suggestions for study material. Have ordered a couple DVDs that have been a little too basic. "Here's the A string! Now, pound 8th notes on it!"

    Quick history: I've played guitar (noodly lead electric and flatpicked acoustic) for about 15 years but haven't been terribly focused or disciplined about it. Was self-taught and absolutely have bad habits. Have limited experience in band situations and have done local jams more frequently.

    I owned a few basses about a decade ago but didn't stick with it at the time.

    Recently picked the instrument back up… feel I've hit a wall with the six-string. I'd like to take in some theory/technique instruction early in the learning process before settling into stupid habits.

    The bassists I like to hear most are Jack Casady, Harvey Brooks, Jamerson, McCartney.

    When I pick up the bass now, I'm playing way too much like a guitar player. Way up and down the neck in pentatonic, like Phil Lesh minus brains and talent. That entertains me just fine in my study, but it's not going to fly with other musicians.

    Can anyone recommend an instructional [book, DVD, whatever] for someone in my situation?

    Cheers
    Drew
  2. JTE

    JTE Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2008
    Location:
    Central Illinois, USA
    First, put the pick down. Not because using a pick us wrong at all. Only because it's too easy for you yo fall I to guitar bits from years of playing that way. Dropping the pick will break up the patterns.

    The go buy a copy of the books "Standing In The Shadows Of Motown" and Ed Freidlands book on building walking basslines. Use those two books.

    John
  3. Drew617

    Drew617

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2014
    Location:
    Watertown, MA
    Hey, how'd you know? Thanks for the advice, it's noted. I'm comfortable enough (comfortable, not necessarily good) with fingerstyle but that's something I hadn't thought of - whatever RH technique bleeds over probably also influences phrasing.

    Both books are on the way - thanks for the recommends.

    Drew
  4. GastonD

    GastonD

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Location:
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Yep those are good, and once you decide (if, that is) to consider, depending on what you're looking for. Being that you seem to need some steering into the "bass way of thinking" I'd say Norm Stockton's DVD are good, but his website (artogfroove.com) is even better, being that at $10 a month it offers two full courses PLUS all of his instructional DVDs (four of them).
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  6. MalcolmAmos

    MalcolmAmos Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2009
    Location:
    Deep East Texas Piney Woods
    I came over from 6 string rhythm guitar. Yep we guitar guys do fill our bass lines too full. Ed's books will teach you about playing chord tones one note at a time.

    IMO we play accompaniment until asked to take a lead break, so chord tones with the root on one is what we do 90% of the time. That means we have to know the notes that are in a chord, not what finger pattern needs to be strummed. What you know from your guitar will flow right into the bass, but, the bass is played differently. We are a harmony and rhythm instrument. The foundation of the song, the guys look to us for the beat and the chord change.

    This helped me.
    Copy and paste this somewhere. Sooner or later it'll come in handy.

    Welcome back.
  7. Jbassrockboy

    Jbassrockboy

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2013
    Location:
    The land down under
    I wouldn't worry too much about sticking with a pick

    But if fingers is what you want to commit to then fair enough

    There are heaps of good books out there and I would start out with something in the style of music you can relate to

    That will at least start you off and you can then branch out to other styles

    The books mentioned by op are good but they a somewhat advanced

    Start with something easy and build it up

    rossa
  8. drumsnbass

    drumsnbass Bassic User Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    Seattle WA area
  9. Jbassrockboy

    Jbassrockboy

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2013
    Location:
    The land down under
    Yep and I have the mel bay complete blues, it's an excellent compilation of work
  10. lyla1953

    lyla1953 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Don't have an opinion about the pick however, these books are very good - you'll need to be able to read notation with both as there is no tab in either.
    Also Roy Vogt's TMBG is a great series as well.
  11. Roy Vogt

    Roy Vogt Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2000
    Location:
    Nashville,TN
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: Accuracy, Carvin, Hotwire, Conklin Basses, DNA, Eden
    Thanks for your support!:)
    http://www.teachmebassguitar.com/?AFFID=89153
    I would also recommend the Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Electric Bass series by David Overthrow and the Jon Liebman Bass Builders Series.
    http://www.daveoverthrow.com/bookpage.html
    http://www.forbassplayersonly.com/

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