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Tally ho!

Discussion in 'Amps [BG]' started by Tull, Dec 14, 2012.


  1. Tull

    Tull

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Hello there, mates, since this is the first time i post something here, i hope you dont go too rough on me!

    Anyway, i've started playing bass recently, and since my wallet is rather thin, i've played it through my Guitar Amplifier, and i was thinking of buying a Good bass amp.

    I Have this band, if you can call it that, and we have done a couple of gigs in a small Bar in my hometown (Always used other people's amps), so if any of you could give me some advice in some vintage-sounding budget amplifiers that would be really cool!

    Thanks!
     
  2. rust_preacher

    rust_preacher Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Location:
    Finland
  3. Tull

    Tull

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    not wanting to look like an *******, but as i said, i dont have much money, and i am still in school, dont you know any bass amps cheaper than that?
     
  4. jlepre

    jlepre

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Location:
    Warwick, NY
    Why not take a look at the amps you've borrowed and by something along those lines?

    Oh and look USED
     
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  6. sokolasty

    sokolasty

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Location:
    Poland
    As a DIYer, I ask what's that Guitar Amplifier, is it yours, and do you consider replacing a speaker and doing some woodworking, if the speaker department isn't closed-back? Especially regarding your thin wallet :)
     
  7. heynorm

    heynorm

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    Peavey. Tough, durable and cheap used.
     
  8. Jackson171

    Jackson171

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Location:
    Las Cruces, NM
    +1 on the Peavey gear. I started on a Peavey TKO 115 back in the late 80's. At that time their top of the line for combos was the Combo 300. I get to play at a small local venue recently that had one of those old Combo 300's in the backline and I was quite impressed with the sound of that amp. At first I was going to set up my SWR rig, but then I tried the Peavey and it was all I needed.

    Find whatever is available locally, try them out, buy the best sounding one you can afford. It will get you further than you think.
     
  9. will33

    will33

    Joined:
    May 22, 2006
    Location:
    austin,tx
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    I assume you are somewhere in great britain (tally ho). I don't know what's affordable there, Ashdown?

    Shop used for the best deals.
     
  10. Tull

    Tull

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    not actually, i'm in portugal, a friend of mine owns a pretty cool ashdown, really love that amp model, i glanced at a fender 150 rumble head, paired up with some speakers (still have not seen any speakers) is the rumble any good?
     
  11. will33

    will33

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    May 22, 2006
    Location:
    austin,tx
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    You wouldn't need a real big rig for playing small bar gigs. A couole hundred watts and most any 212 or 410 will do it. Or possibly a good quality 210 or 115 such as the older Trace Elliot 115's or Peavey Black Widows.

    Just a ballpark there as to how much power and speakers to look for.
     
  12. Tull

    Tull

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    yes, i was thinking of either a "big" combo amp or a 100-200 watt head and some speakers, the thing is most bass amps nowadays sound pretty modern, and im not looking for that at all,, and i never know what to expect
     
  13. will33

    will33

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    Use a cabinet that does not have a tweeter, or, you can always shut off or disable the tweeter if you find a good deal on one that does. (most have them nowdays).

    I've never owned a Rumble, they have some fans around here though. Go play it, see what you think.
     
  14. will33

    will33

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    Some people have said the Rumbles are pretty good amps, but the speakers in some of the combos aren't all that great. So, if it's just the amp head, and you get ahold of a nice speaker, coukd make a pretty nice rig.

    Let your own ears decide. A bunch of people on the internet will just tell you to get whatever they play. Mess with the eq knobs. Most amps can be dialed up to sound more vintage, or brighter/more modern. That's what the knobs are for. A real tube amp would be pretty nice, but probably out of your budget.
     
  15. dhsierra1

    dhsierra1

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2009
    Location:
    Central CA Coast
    The Hartke LH500 has the Fender Showman (tube) preamp going into a 350/500 watt (8/4 ohms) ss power section. Goes for around US$350 new. Should get you the vintage Fender sound with a lot of power at a very good price.

    +1 on the cab suggestions above, no tweeter or shut it off if you're looking for vintage sound.
     
  16. Tull

    Tull

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Thanks on the tips, imma check the Hartke LH500, about the rumbles, they sound pretty nice, but i dont know if they are reliable in a gig or band practice, dunno why, always saw them as starter amps
     
  17. Tull

    Tull

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    is hartke also a good speaker brand or should i look for another brand for the speakers?
     
  18. will33

    will33

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    I didn't think about the Hartke LH, that would be a good one. Most anything that says Ampeg on it sort of goes together with classic tone. I don't know what those cost used over there, a 3pro would be nice. Most Ashdowns I've heard also have a pretty "thick/beefy" default sound.

    Or, another way to go is pick up most any amp you get a good deal on and then use a pedal to turn it into old-school sound.
     
  19. will33

    will33

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    Hartke makes pretty good stuff people can afford. They're older speakers are know for being pretty bright sounding though, especially the 10's. Don't know about the newer ones. I always thought their old aluminum 15's sounded pretty nice. Good thump, some pretty good topend for a 15 but not too overly bright. Nothing you can't tame down by turning the tone knob on your bass back a little bit or playing flatwound strings.
     
  20. Tull

    Tull

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    I Can't get flatwounds, i mean, i can, but my bass has a kinda strong low end (especially on the neck pickup, obviously) and it becomes rather muddy and unpleasant, so yeah, i will have to be aware of that before getting the speakers, thank you guys, i will check the speakers as soon as possible, since the hartke lh 500 almost set my path! really loved that head...for the price at least
     
  21. will33

    will33

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    Make sure you use your bass when checking out speakers. The combination of a woofier sounding bass and a brighter sounding speaker may end up in a really nice sounding spot when you combine the 2.

    Woofy speaker + woofy bass might equal mud.

    Bright bass + bright speaker might equal all twang and no "oomph".
     

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