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Tech or Luthier in NJ

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by baconbits89, Feb 6, 2014.

  1. baconbits89

    baconbits89

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    I'm looking for a bass tech or luthier in NJ for a set-up on my Fender American Standard Jazz.

    I've had multiple set-ups done at the traditional corporate shops throughout the years, and have been left wholly unsatisfied. Had some potential RSI issues in recent months, and am looking for a good set-up with some super low action and much better playability. Not sure if my bass is the issue, or I've just been lacking a great set-up to make my Jazz play like butter.

    Any recommendations? Sorry if this is the wrong forum - new to posting (despite the age of my account). Thank you!
  2. MikeCanada

    MikeCanada

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    Honestly, unless you need your frets dressed (if they feel sharp like they're sticking out too far on the edge of the neck) get yourself some hex keys and little screw drivers and do it yourself.

    There are a ton of youtube videos about setup and other resources out there, but it's all pretty intuitive. If your truss rod needs to be adjusted because you have too much/too little relief, do that first with the strings tuned to tension. After you're happy with the truss rod, set the action by adjusting the saddle heights, then check the intonation with the 12th fret harmonic. If it's flat or sharp, move the saddle forward or back accordingly.

    Make small adjustments at first to make sure you are going in the right directions. If your truss rod won't turn, try the opposite direction. There's a chance it's as far as it can go one way or the other. Otherwise if you do something wrong you're just turning screws anyway, so you can always turn them back. Leave some of the more intense stuff like fret dressing and cutting a new nut and things to the professionals, but simply lowering your action or getting the right truss rod relief really doesn't need to cost you whatever some guitar shop is going to charge for it.
  3. mr.black

    mr.black

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  4. baconbits89

    baconbits89

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    Thanks, I'll look into those places. While I'm *sure* I could figure out how to do basic truss rod and saddle adjustments, I'd be petrified to try on my Jazz to start. Though would definitely be a good skill to pick to make fine adjustments on my own.

    Do any of these people specialize in working with basses? Is that a thing, or does any guitar techs in general do that kind of work?
  5. markth30

    markth30 Supporting Member

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    I second http://thefretworks.com/

    George Goumas does fantastic work.

    I recently had a full setup and some mods done by him.
    Fret sprout filed down, frets dressed, fingerboard edges rolled, wiring harness voiced(new pots caps to my liking), new bridge installed(old holes plugged), and a fully shielded pickup cavity. He checked with me every step of the way to make sure I knew what he was doing and signed off on it.

    Great guy
  6. back as a wolf

    back as a wolf

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    go new jersey :bassist: :D!!! but seriously, as it was mentioned before I think you would be much better off if you really read up on it and researched it and did it yourself. it'll be invaluable knowledge once you get it under your belt. if you're around the central NJ area and absolutely must have someone else do it, be sure to check out Lou Rose in Edison. I bought my very first bass there, my dad used to go there for ALL of his gear back in the 70's, and it's the same dude who runs it. super knowledgeable, friendly, and efficient. it's more of a mom and pop place as opposed to like sam ash or *shudders* guitar center. sorry for the rambling!
  7. Buskman

    Buskman

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  8. ShoeManiac

    ShoeManiac Supporting Member

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    This topic has been coming up a fair amount over in the New Jersey Bassist thread. There have been a good number of recommendations, too. But clearly some of them are going to depend on where you're located in the state.
  9. Clark Dark

    Clark Dark

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  10. bassmyf

    bassmyf

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    If you are anywhere around Point Pleasant, Leroy Aiello is the best around.....
  11. Rusty G String

    Rusty G String

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    Buy the cheapest bass on craigslist and put the wrenches to it. No fear of messing it up. Then do your own. There's nothing like knowing your bass is setup as good as it can be exactly the way you want it. I even started doing fret dressing. Just started setting up friends guitars for free, and showed them how to do it. It's scary thinking you'll be making adjustments that might make it worse, then you won't get it back again. Get a cheap bad to practice and you won't look back. Then sell the bass for more money with a fresh setup. I'm in south jersey, btw.
  12. Steveaux

    Steveaux

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    ^^^^^^^^^

    Do.

    It.

    Yourself.

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