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The low E on a bass is what note on a piano?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by jealousblues, Nov 13, 2013.

  1. jealousblues

    jealousblues

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    Is the lowest note on a standard tuned 4 string bass (E) an E0 or an E1 or what on a piano?
  2. David_70

    David_70 Supporting Member

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  3. somegeezer

    somegeezer

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  4. jealousblues

    jealousblues

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    is there such a note as "E0?"


    the reason im asking is we are moving some midi sequences off a keyboard to a software suite.

    The song in question is Brown Eyed Girl which starts with "E, F#, G" or something like that.
    On the keyboard it says the notes in the sequence are E0, F#0, G0
    and they sound fine.

    When we put it into the software suite with sampled sounds...those notes are too low for it to play.
  5. seanm

    seanm I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize! Supporting Member

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    Yes. A piano goes down to A0.
  6. Reddog01

    Reddog01

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    This chart is incorrect -- it's showing the tuning notes one octave too low. The highest string, G, is the first G below middle C. This chart show it one octave too low.
  7. Jensby design

    Jensby design

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    Oh yeah, that's the E-string on my 6-string bass when I am not D-dropin.
    One of these days I will tune it back up to F#0 :ninja: then I'll have an open E1 string :ninja: it just seems a little silly for a 6 to not have as much high range as a 4 :meh:
  8. White Beard

    White Beard

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    Bass is actually written one octave higher than it sounds. It's written that way to compensate for an excess of lower ledger lines when playing. However, also being a tuba player (which is written as sounds), I'm actually used to reading that low.
  9. bassybill

    bassybill The smooth moderator... Supporting Member

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    No, the chart is correct. Bass music is notated one octave higher than it sounds for ease of reading (as is guitar music). So, the open G string as is written on the staff as being in the top space of the bass clef, a fourth below middle C, but the actual note sounds one octave below that, as shown in the chart.

    To answer the OP's question, the low E on a standard bass is E1, 41.2 Hz and this is the same pitch as the lowest E on the piano (despite being written for bass as if it was one octave above that). The lowest piano keys on a conventional instrument are A0, A#, B0 (lowest note on a 5 string bass), C1 et cetera. Note that octave numbers change when you get up to C. So, the lowest E on the piano is E1, same as the open E on your bass. E0 is 20.6 Hz and a perfect fourth below the bottom A on the piano.
  10. Reddog01

    Reddog01

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    My bad. I also play bass trombone, and we read it like it is written. I, too, can read all those low ledger lines.

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