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The right amp for my experiment

Discussion in 'Amps [BG]' started by bananaghost, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. bananaghost

    bananaghost

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    I recently saw a two piece group with a particularly innovative guitarist. He used an octaver to boost his lower end, then ran it into a bass amp and was able to craft awesome tones in the lower register. I've been thinking about using a similar technique to fill in the higher frequencies in a bass and drum project. If I were to split my signal, run one end into my bass rig and the other into a pitch shifter (I've been leaning towards the POG 2) and into my Vox AC15 guitar amp to sculpt my high end would I run the risk of damaging the guitar amp? I've been told not to run a bass into the guitar amp because the lower frequencies could damage the speaker, but if it's only being used for the upper frequencies would that still apply?
  2. decentbassbreh

    decentbassbreh

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  3. wcriley

    wcriley

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    Disclosures:
    Uncompensated endorsing user: fEARful
    If the pitch shifter allows you to send only the higher frequencies to the Vox amp, you'll be fine.
  4. clmayhew

    clmayhew

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    Thanks for the insight.

    I don't see why you'd have an issue. Are you separating the frequencies with a crossover?
  5. lz4005

    lz4005

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    If you're sending mostly the wet (octave up) signal from the pitch shifter into the guitar amp it shouldn't be much different from a guitar signal. At least in terms of potential speaker damage.

    You should be able to blend in some dry signal if it sounds good to you as well. I wouldn't go 100% dry signal into the AC15 at high volume, though. That's when damage is more likely.
  6. bananaghost

    bananaghost

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    Awesome, thanks for all of the input! I look forward to trying this out.

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