The stages of pleasure of bass purchase

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by belzebass, Feb 18, 2014.


  1. belzebass

    belzebass

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Hello, everybody (and especially serial buyers)!

    I'd like to know what you consider most pleasant part of bass purchase:

    1) Choosing a model (checking gear news, looking at reviews, listening to soundclips, comparing the models)
    2) Chasing the good deal (looking for the best price between online and shop vendors, searching craiglist, etc)
    3) the moment of the purchase (the moment you buy in the shop, or when meeting the seller from Craiglist, or making the payment online)
    4) Waiting for the brown truck (or driving home with the new bass)
    5) Discovering the bass and the first hand experience (looking at construction, finish, first times playing the bass)
    6) Further exploring the bass (say first week, when you play different configurations, and different styles, first rehearsal with the bass)
    7) First gig with the bass

    Thanks a lot!
    I always wondered how it is for other people. For me it's certainly 1 and 2, and in lesser extent 5 and 6.

    Hope I dont mess up the poll :)
  2. SoVeryTired

    SoVeryTired Endorsing nothing, recommending much Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Location:
    Milton Keynes, UK
    There's nothing fun about handing over money or waiting for a delivery, but everything else is good. I also enjoy the "Challenging my assumptions" stage whehn trying out an instrument in store, and realising that what I thought I liked isn't really the right thing for me after all.
  3. Maxdusty

    Maxdusty Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    Location:
    Michigan USA
    Other than playing it... #2 by far.
    The thrill of the hunt.
    I have a list of basses that I keep and periodically look at CL, garage sales, pawn shops etc. Looking for that rare hidden gem among crap. Where I live, they do pop up in the strangest of places. Found a fairly rare bass once out in the countryside owned by a farmer. Didn't know what he had and I certainly wasn't expecting it.

    I must really enjoy it as I've done it over 60 times in less than 3 years. :)
  4. panamonte

    panamonte

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2009
    Location:
    Brighton, UK
    I LOVE that bit. The intense anticipation - knowing that any moment (will it be in 5 minutes or 5 hours?) the van's going to pull up outside and you're going to have a big, exciting cardboard box to open.
  5. Register to disable this ad
  6. Maxdusty

    Maxdusty Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    Location:
    Michigan USA
    That's the most stressful part! At least it is here...wondering what condition the box is in and what the poor bass endured during it's travel to your front door.
  7. belzebass

    belzebass

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012

    Haha, nothing better than intense craving followed by a dopamine rush, isn't it?
  8. Groove Doctor

    Groove Doctor

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #2 is always fun. Finding a rare gem.
    If I don't buy it I'm very happy to share the details with other bass players who might snap it up. :)

    #5 First Play and #7 First Gig can be the best OR the worst depending.
  9. Wallace320

    Wallace320

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2012
    Location:
    Milan, Italy
    First gig is its prime, so a baptyzm of fire

    Will it kill or will it reveal lame and average?

    Some of my basses never reached for the stage, 'cause I sold them almost right out of the case/gigbag, when finally tested with my gear and found less inspirational than in the shop (never ever bought anything sight unseen) with resident gear

    The gig, the gig

    I play for the stage

    and even if some instrument is better for the stage, some other (technically) for the studio, if they don't deliver live, they don't stay

    Cheers,
    Wallace
  10. pudgychef

    pudgychef

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2005
    Location:
    Chongqing, China
    hmm - hard to select just one part of it.

    Love the research and anticipation.....

    That feeling on a first gig with a bass (or even 'that' rehearsal when it suddenly feels like an extension of yourself) is friggin awesome

    Maybe the best is that first bond...like when you try a bass and 'know' it has to come home
  11. Liam McMonigle

    Liam McMonigle

    Joined:
    May 14, 2013
    Location:
    Newcastle Upon Tyne, England.
    Definetly 3,4,5
  12. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens NY
    I suppose mine is the initial discovery and exploration of the bass. My favorite part is restringing with my strings of choice, setting it up, tuning it, and plugging it in for the first time.
  13. dls119

    dls119

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2013
    Location:
    PGH
    Yes. But I also love chasing a good deal.
  14. LeonD

    LeonD Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2001
    Location:
    Uxbridge, Massachusetts
    Number 6 for me. It usually takes me months to decide if the bass is a keeper or not. That stage where I learn what the bass can and can't do and then finally if it stays or not.

    When it stays, it makes all the above steps worth it.
  15. gregmon79

    gregmon79 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2012
    Media:
    49
    Albums:
    2
    Location:
    Chicagoland area
    I said waiting for the brown truck. But, I dont buy a lot of basses. I buy more pedals. So I sort of inserted pedals for bass. I love the anticipation of waiting and the best part is the day I know it is to be delivered, and I keep checking the tracking status and it gets to the 'delivered" status and I know its sitting at home waiting for me. That is probably the best part, next to actually opening it up and plugging it in to my rig or board and learning it and get to know it. That is so exciting to me. Super addictive. Its like if I dont get a package in the mail every other week or so I feel like something is missing.
  16. snyderz

    snyderz Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2000
    Location:
    AZ mountains
    I said all of the above, but added 'When I arrive for rehearsal and my bandmates run over to see what I showed up with this time.'
  17. brownie_bass

    brownie_bass [this space for sale, cheap] Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2013
    Location:
    New York, NY
    #4.5: Realizing you forgot to tell your wife that you bought another bass.
  18. SteveC

    SteveC

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Forks, North Dakota
    Opening the box.
    I also kind of like the wait.
  19. rtslinger

    rtslinger

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Location:
    Belleville,New Jersey USA
    I chose first gig that is the true test for me. My reason for this is I play more aggressively live I guess is the best way to put it.
  20. groove pump

    groove pump

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    In time, the step that's become my recurring favorite is the one where I try out "boutique" basses here and there. Expectations can run a little high when sampling an instrument with a price tag at well over a grand, but they just don't thrill me like my beloved Franken-Jazz... which cost me $350 when I found it several years ago.
  21. Fuzzbass

    Fuzzbass Gnarsty bass tones Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2001
    Location:
    Maryland, between Bawlmer & DC
    LeonD's post applies to me too.

    The finest moment is when you become certain that you have a keeper. That makes all the preliminary phases rewarding as well.

    For me, knowing that I have a keeper never comes on first play, and rarely if ever happens on the first gig. Only after I've had the bass for awhile, and used it with my different rigs, different bands, different environments, can I give it my stamp of approval.

    Heck, when I first got the bass in my avatar (2005 black Sadowsky P5) it didn't wow me. That was partly because I forgot that the active EQ was boost only. But once I gigged the bass a few times, I KNEW it was a keeper.

    As others have said, winding up with a mediocre instrument is a bummer. That can happen even after taking all the right precautions.

Share This Page