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This is what I do with new flatwounds

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Jay2U, Nov 3, 2013.


  1. Jay2U

    Jay2U Not as bad as he lóòks Supporting Member

    Dec 7, 2010
    22 ft below sea level
  2. shawshank72

    shawshank72

    Mar 22, 2009
    Canada
    Thats dedication.
    People dont realize how much gunk are on new strings.
    Love the super glue trick, am going to try it myself.
    After those EB's settle in for a month or so they will be thumpy goodness.
     
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  4. Are you gonna post sound clips or what? :D
     
  5. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps
    Wow, that's taking a string change seriously!
     
  6. Stone Soup

    Stone Soup

    Dec 3, 2012
    I might just try that once. I like the super glue idea. :)
     
  7. neckdive

    neckdive

    Oct 11, 2013
    This is fantastic. Thank you for taking the time to produce and share this video.
     
  8. GKon

    GKon Supporting Member, Boom-Chicka-Boom Supporting Member

    Feb 17, 2013
    Athens, Greece
    Very interesting. Seems to make good sense, too. Thanks for the info.
     
  9. bassdude51

    bassdude51

    Nov 1, 2008
    Central Ohio
    Thanks for the video. Interesting tips.

    I use naphtha or acetone or lacquer to clean my flats and leave it at that. Some brands of flats are all clean and ready to go out of the pack. Other brands are filthy like Pyramids. That black stuff is the polishing compound and metal residue.

    I'd suggest not using any type of water based liquid or super glue on strings as it can soak into the windings and effect performance.

    I've used a bit of hot wax on silk to keep it from fraying but mostly use hot wax on used sets of string because the silk can get pretty frayed.

    When installing strings, I continually tug the loose string from nut to bridge by sliding downward to get any twists out of the strings. That way, they vibrate better when not twisted.
     
  10. Jay2U

    Jay2U Not as bad as he lóòks Supporting Member

    Dec 7, 2010
    22 ft below sea level
    - The droplet of superglue sits beyond the saddle and beyond the nut, so it doesn't affect the sound.
    - Youre right about checking the string for twists. A twisted string may sound... twisted. If the string sits relatively loose through the bridge, it'll settle automatically while it is being wound around the peg. It certainly wont hurt to check on eventual twisting.
     
  11. Cheers, mate. A very nice job, well done.
     
  12. Wow! That's the last time I complain about changing my strings! Excellent detailed video.
    Take Care,
    Brent
     
  13. tjh

    tjh Supporting Member

    Mar 22, 2006
    Minnesota
    nice job! .. thanks for posting .. the only thing I thought curious, was setting the witness points before bringing the string to pitch ... I usually bring to pitch, stretch up a few times, retune, set witness points, then check tuning again ... with the string loose, it looked like you may have pulled the point you set at the nut well beyond the nut when brought to pitch ... kudos for taking the time to post!!
     
  14. Jay2U

    Jay2U Not as bad as he lóòks Supporting Member

    Dec 7, 2010
    22 ft below sea level
    I added some annotations concerning twisted strings and tuning (nearly) to pitch before setting witness points. ;) :smug:
     



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