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Timing of seam repair?

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by tornadobass, Feb 24, 2013.


  1. tornadobass

    tornadobass Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: Black Diamond & SuperSensitive strings
    A 3" section of seam has opened up on the bottom back of my carved bass. The shop I got it from a few years ago used a dampit and I guess it dripped onto that seam. This same spot opened up a couple of years ago, too and I had it reglued. I don't use a dampit, so that isn't the cause.

    My question...for durability of the re-glue, is it best to do the repair now or wait until winter is over and humidity goes up a bit? Or does it matter?
     
  2. I would guess with "it depends".

    If it is at the block, I would take it in sooner because the repairs there can be more costly from what I have been told.

    If not, I would get a wax pen or regular pencil and mark on the rib where the seam break currently is and keep an eye on it. I'll also take a picture of it to compare. If it starts spreading rapidly, then to the doc. I use this method on my basses, then take them in when I get some free time. Whether it is the right way to handle the situation, I dunno, but if it was mine, I would just keep an eye on it and take it in in the spring if it stayed stable.

    You could call your luthier too and hear what they have to say about it since they know the bass.
     
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  4. Jake deVilliers

    Jake deVilliers Supporting Member

    May 24, 2006
    Crescent Beach, BC
    Disclosures:
    Owner of The Bass Spa, String Repairman at Long & McQuade Vancouver
    I'm from the 'Fix it before the wood forgets how its supposed to be shaped' school of repair. This also keeps the seam from becoming contaminated with dirt and oils which may hamper the future repair. YMMV
     
  5. That is a great point Jake. I hadn't considered the shape of the wood being forgotten which was exactly what happened to a bass I bought that had an open seam for who knows how long. The seller didn't know and the rib was out of alignment. This was a long separation and the rib had to be reformed(?) when it was repaired.
     
  6. tornadobass

    tornadobass Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: Black Diamond & SuperSensitive strings
    Good point...I think the wood warped out a little bit from the dripping Dampit. I'll arrange for a re-glue soon.
     
  7. johninmemphis

    johninmemphis Supporting Member

    Nov 11, 2005
    Memphis, TN
    Why not mix some hide glue and find a few spool clamps and do the repair yourself real soon?
     
  8. johninmemphis

    johninmemphis Supporting Member

    Nov 11, 2005
    Memphis, TN
    And take it to a professional later for follow-up.
     
  9. tornadobass

    tornadobass Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: Black Diamond & SuperSensitive strings
    I actually do have some glue and a glue pot, but I've never used it. Hmmm...
     
  10. 1st Bass

    1st Bass

    May 26, 2005
    Forest Grove, OR
    For a job that small, you could prepare the glue (a teaspoon or less in enough water to cover it), in a teacup, warm it in the microwave or just let it sit in a bowl of hot water. If I have a quick, easy job like that one, I get the clamps, etc. together, then warm the glue in the microwave. Go easy with it, though-- it is very easy to overheat it. 10-15 seconds may be sufficient.

    Clean the joint with a brush and hot water, until any dry, crumbled, old glue is gone, insert the fresh, hot, hide glue with a palette knife, wipe off the excess, and clamp it closed. Clean up with hot water and leave it overnight. Should be good.
     
  11. Where could one find the proper clamps?
     
  12. johninmemphis

    johninmemphis Supporting Member

    Nov 11, 2005
    Memphis, TN
    Easy - warm the glue to 140-160 degrees F in a jar sitting in a pot of water on the stove; apply the glue and clamp overnight or longer. Just be sure to stick with hide glue. You can find sets of spool clamps on the Internet for under $30.
     
  13. Or you could make your own clamps for a couple of bucks with lengths of allthread, wingnuts and old skateboard wheels.
     
  14. Jake deVilliers

    Jake deVilliers Supporting Member

    May 24, 2006
    Crescent Beach, BC
    Disclosures:
    Owner of The Bass Spa, String Repairman at Long & McQuade Vancouver
    Skateboard wheels, eh? I don't know where I'd scrounge up 40 - 50 skate board wheels! ;)

    I use plywood with cork or leather glued to it, then a hole saw in the drill press. And ready rod, washers and wingnuts.
     
  15. JDBassist51

    JDBassist51

    Sep 30, 2012
    Sherman NY
    I used 2" diameter wood dowels, cut to 1 3/8", drilled the center holes, and used cork or leather as Jake describes above.
     
  16. I forgot youse guys skate on blades, not wheels. :p

    A roller rink or a skate shop would be a logical place to inquire, Goodwill or Salvation Army in a pinch.

    I'm going to be starting another project soon (yes, Jake, the FrankenFlatback is coming to Kamp KUNGfu) and that's what I plan to do.

    When I first saw the skate-wheel clamp, I almost slapped myself for not thinking of it first. It's so obvious.
     
  17. Jake deVilliers

    Jake deVilliers Supporting Member

    May 24, 2006
    Crescent Beach, BC
    Disclosures:
    Owner of The Bass Spa, String Repairman at Long & McQuade Vancouver
    Hey KUNGPOWCHICKEN, that's really good news. I hate to see decent old basses slowly failing from neglect.

    Good luck with Flattenstein! ;)
     
  18. We'll call it good news when it plays again...
     
  19. Jake deVilliers

    Jake deVilliers Supporting Member

    May 24, 2006
    Crescent Beach, BC
    Disclosures:
    Owner of The Bass Spa, String Repairman at Long & McQuade Vancouver
    Hey man, tHere's no rush, eh? ;)
     



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