to use powered mixer or combo amp as preamp?

Discussion in 'Amps [BG]' started by benrutschilling, Dec 27, 2013.


  1. benrutschilling

    benrutschilling

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2013
    Hello guys,

    I'm new to the talk bass forums. I've been reading on It for quite a while but this is my first post.

    my dilemma is should I use my samick 15 watt combo amp or my Samson xml610 powered mixer as my preamp for my rig?

    the rest of my rig is as follows
    fuzz face pedal
    crown ce1000 amplifier
    alesis 3630 rack stereo compressor with gate
    homemade 1x15 cabinet

    thanks in advance, and looking forward to posting more..
     
  2. Bass_Pounder

    Bass_Pounder

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2002
    Location:
    Palm Coast, Florida
    Can't really see a Samick 15 watter as having a good preamp, let alone a preamp output.

    I would use the mixer (and remember to use a line out, NOT a speaker output).
     
  3. Bassnoise

    Bassnoise

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Mixer gets my vote also
     
  4. Bass_Pounder

    Bass_Pounder

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2002
    Location:
    Palm Coast, Florida
    Also, given that you only have a 1X15, I would just use the powered mixer as your amp for now. Plug a speaker output into the 1X15, and your good to go.

    Using the mixer as a pre into a power amp is only going to give you the same tone as your powered mixer, just more wattage behind it.
     
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  6. Joe Louvar

    Joe Louvar

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Location:
    Santa Rosa, CA USA
    Welcome to TB. :)

    Bass -> Petals -> Mixer -> Amp -> Cab.

    EDIT: Oops, I missed that its a powered mixer and broken. I recommend starting over with a real bass rig or bass combo amp.
     
  7. benrutschilling

    benrutschilling

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2013
    My amp in my powered mixer is broke or something. It clips when its quiet.. And the samick has a line out
     
  8. benrutschilling

    benrutschilling

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2013
    Also. I heard the alesis 3630 compressor sucks for bass. Should I be using this for heavy rock/metal sound?
     
  9. dincz

    dincz

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2010
    Location:
    Czech Republic
    Your mixer only has line and mic inputs - both have too low impedance for a passive bass and even with an active you could have level problems. So you'd need to go through a DI first.
     
  10. Sid Fang

    Sid Fang Reformed Fusion Player Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    You are giving yourself two bad choices here. You at least nead a direct box (DI) to work with your mixer, and for a little bit more money than a dedicated DI box, you should be able to find a more useful pre-amp that you can run straight to your power amp. Be careful, though. Some of the cheaper bass "pre-amp" pedals out there don't actually have enough line output signal to drive a power amp effectively.

    As for the compressor, I don't know the model, but it's a general-purpose studio compressor that I doubt would "suck for bass", but you'd probably have to play around with the settings a bit to get the sort of compression that's musical on a bass guitar.
     
  11. benrutschilling

    benrutschilling

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2013
    My powered mixer has line inputs. Can't I just hook it up to there? If not I have asmall passive do if that's what you're talking about.
     
  12. dincz

    dincz

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2010
    Location:
    Czech Republic
    Your mixer only has line and mic inputs - both have too low impedance for a passive bass and even with an active you could have level problems. So you'd need to go through a DI first.
     
  13. ThisBass

    ThisBass

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Location:
    Germany
    A low impedance line input don't fits to passive pickups.
    But I don't see any arguments why a line input shall not fit to an active instruments out.
    DI is nice to have but not all the time necessary.
    Even on stage a DI may sometimes be obsolete.
     
  14. Sid Fang

    Sid Fang Reformed Fusion Player Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    Maybe people weren't clear enough. Instrument pickup circuits have a very high impedance, because of the way they are built and work - lots and lots of windings around magnetic cores. If you plug it into an amp or mixer "line in" jack that's designed around the industry standard for bridging between electronic devices, it will be able to extract some signal, but the level will be low and the frequency response will be highly distorted, losing lots high frequencies. It "works" but it sounds like sh*t. Active pickups put out more signal, which helps, but they are still designed around the expectation of a high impedence input channel. You can use that kind of hookup for casual practicing at home, but not for recording or performance.

    Some mixers have high-impedence options on their 1/4" inputs, but it's not the industry standard and not something one can assume going into a gig, unless one is providing the board.
     

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