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Tru Oil on a neck with block inlays

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by bray101, Mar 27, 2014.


  1. bray101

    bray101 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2012
    Location:
    Ohio
    I just bought a Squier VM Jazz neck with the black binding and inlays.

    The advertised neck on eBay said it was finished with vintage tint gloss, but this is not the case. It feels like bare wood.

    I talked to the seller and he offered me a refund if I return, or a partial refund if I keep it.

    I normally sand all my necks down on the back and tru oil them, but I've never done this to an actual fretboard.

    Will these block inlays take tru oil if i apply it to the fretboard as well? I believe they are plastic. Not 100% positive though.

    If not, I'll just return it.

    Thanks. ImageUploadedByTalkBass1395975196.703843.jpg
     
  2. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    Houston Tx
    That neck has a finish, its a satin poly. I don't know how well an oil finish like tru oil will work without sanding it off first.
     
  3. bray101

    bray101 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2012
    Location:
    Ohio

    I knew the new ones had a satin finish, but this is a little ridiculous if it has a finish. I have a cabinet I'm working on that is still bare wood sanded to 1500 grit. Feels the same, maybe a little tougher actually.
     
  4. bray101

    bray101 Supporting Member

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    Feb 26, 2012
    Location:
    Ohio
    Also, not sure what it would do to the blocks and binding.
     
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  6. Harry Cahyadi

    Harry Cahyadi Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2013
    Location:
    Clayton, VIC, Australia
    Disclosures:
    C Basses Owner & Builder
    As Hopkins said, it has got a thin layer of sation poly on the fretboard, so you probably want to sand it down before applying the oil.

    The black blocks are not inlays. They are black painted blocks.

    I have got one of those.

    May I know why do you want to apply oil to the fretboard?
    The reason for asking is because it feels and plays great already as is.
     
  7. bray101

    bray101 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2012
    Location:
    Ohio
    Well I just put it together this evening, and it just all feels like bare wood. The seller on eBay said it was "manufacturer refurbished" and it has the replacement serial number sticker applied over the original serial.

    I'm not sure what the exact reason was for him getting the refurb before selling it. I'm it lying when I say this neck has zero finish. Haha.

    The fretboard is the only place that looks like it may have the thinnest layer of poly ever.

    Other than that, it looks and feels like bare wood. I was thinking tru oil simply for sealing purposes.

    I guess it's just that I was expecting the model with the gloss finish, which I prefer, and which was in the listing I purchased.
     
  8. Harry Cahyadi

    Harry Cahyadi Supporting Member

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    C Basses Owner & Builder
    I'm not sure how it has been refurbished.

    The brand new one should have a super thin neck (like Geddy lee version), with a satin (almost matte I can say) poly on it.
    That satin poly gives it fast feeling when you play it, and IMHO it is actually better than the glossy neck.

    Yours might be in a different condition since you said that it has been refurbished.

    Wipe it with a damp cloth and you would definitely find out whether it has got finish or not.
     
  9. gregmon79

    gregmon79 Supporting Member

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    I know exactly what you mean bray. I just bought a Mighty Mite replacement neck, and while its not exactly like the neck you have, it is a direct Fender/Squier replacement of course, and I thought that the neck I got was unfinished. The wood seems so naked. It is smooth though, but Hopkins had told me that they are indeed finished, just very finely. I want to finish mine a little more too as I am putting it on a bass I refinished a few months ago and it has a very natural light amber tint to it because I used tung and rub on poly by minwax. I sort of want the same for the neck. But, Im more worried about the frets getting covers with finish. How do you go about scraping that off the frets?? With what kind of tool? I dont want to damage them.

    Sorry for the thread derail. Thank you for any input anyone has. I really appreciate it.
     
  10. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    Houston Tx
    Your MM neck will probably need some minor fret work, so if you finish it first the finish will be removed while doing the fret work
     
  11. ctmullins

    ctmullins Registered thumper Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Location:
    MS Gulf Coast
    Here's how you remove unwanted finish from your frets:

    1. String the bass with Rotos.
    2. Tune up.
    3. Rock out.

    Done.

    I apply either Formby's Tung Oil or Tru-Oil to all of my fingerboards, both fretted and fretless. No issues, no problems, no worries.
     
  12. gregmon79

    gregmon79 Supporting Member

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    Thanks all!! Looks like I'll be going to her hardware store this weekend.
     
  13. bray101

    bray101 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2012
    Location:
    Ohio

    Meaning tru oil over an existing poly?!? I figured that would never work. I always sand mine off the back of necks.

    Never done the fretboard before.

    Thanks.
     
  14. gregmon79

    gregmon79 Supporting Member

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    Yeah, that's a good point, I'd have to sand the entire neck down first wouldn't I??
     
  15. ctmullins

    ctmullins Registered thumper Supporting Member

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    Apr 18, 2008
    Location:
    MS Gulf Coast
    No, meaning over bare wood.
     
  16. Beej

    Beej

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Sanding a fretboard with frets in it is a pain in the butt, and not advised on maple. Some of those necks had real blocks, some are painted on, most newer are painted blocks...if you really want to do this, consider spraying right over it with a tinted polyurethane, all said it will likely be easier...
     
  17. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2006
    Location:
    Bristow, VA
    I did some maintenance on my Sterling with a maple neck recently. It's a Limited Edition, so it has an inlay at the 12th fret.

    I put Tru-Oil on the board and the back of the neck. I didn't do any sanding on the board first. The Tru-Oil didn't hurt anything.

    I'd say to just sand the back of the neck and then Tru-Oil the whole thing (front and back). When you put it on, just be sure to apply with a paper towel, wait a couple of minutes, then buff it all with a paper towel, and make sure you give extra attention to the fretboard to buff off any oil that is on or up against the frets, to keep it from building up there.

    [​IMG]
     

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