Twelve bar lite

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Zegie, Feb 16, 2014.


  1. Zegie

    Zegie

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    Location:
    UK South East
    As a purely theoretical exercise and in a crazy moment I started to consider the notes in a 12 bar in G just to see what 'overlaps' there might be. I noted that the fifth of G is the D and the fifth of C Is the G and of course the first of D is D. So it could be argued that all you need are the notes G and D to play a 12 bar.

    It would be the most unexciting bass line ever played but it made me begin to wonder what other 'lite' versions for chord progressions might worth exploring.
     
  2. Fergie Fulton

    Fergie Fulton

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    London,NewYork,Paris,Braintree
    Not only could be but is.
    Many Chord progression overlap..that is the beauty of a progressions that it flows.
    Your example is simple Cycle of 5ths based on Tetra chords
    So;
    C is CDEF GABC
    G is GABC DEFG
    D is DEFG ABCD

    to make them the correct keys you add a # to the F for G major, F & C for D Major. This also allows you to 'overlap' in to A minor, E minor and Bb minor.

    Check out a "50s" progression of I VI IV V or I VI II V same idea again of the Harmonised Major scale.
     
  3. Zegie

    Zegie

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    Location:
    UK South East

    Fascinating. So apart from counting it all out on your fingers or writing it down as your Tetra chord example, are there any established 'rules' or ways of identifying 'overlapping' progressions either theoretically or on the fretboard?
     
  4. wrench45us

    wrench45us

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2011
    Chord progressions are smooth because of shared notes or small steps.
    But I'd venture to say, because it's what I've been taught,chord substitutions are usually based on shared notes.
     
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  6. Fergie Fulton

    Fergie Fulton

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    London,NewYork,Paris,Braintree
    Yes you have it, chords have a relationship to other chords, some chords can be substituted for other chords, never mind the approach that a bass player can come at them from.
    Tetrachord theory will layout only so much, but is a great foundation, i believe an essential foundation but that is just me, to understanding better the construction elements in music.

    Check out these to videos that deconstruct two simple songs and how their construction can cross over to make new tension, so change the feel.

    Lenny
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=spoBqV5xfO0&feature=plcp

    Riveria Paradise
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=plcp&v=g0rpIfrhM0E
     

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