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US Peavey Cirrus truss rod help

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by jacoby75, Dec 15, 2012.

  1. jacoby75

    jacoby75

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    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Guitars, DR Strings
    Hey guys,

    I recently acquired a used US Peavey Cirrus 5 string, and when I tried to adjust the truss rod, I realized that I don't have a tool that will work. Is there a special tool required for cirruses? I have the T-topped metal rod used to adjust Fenders that works on most of my other basses, but the truss rod in the Peavey is mounted too far back in the hole under the truss rod cover. I can't get the truss rod tool into the hole. I tried an allen wrench, but the groove that the truss rod is in is too narrow to allow for any more than about a 1/32 of a turn of the wrench, and then you can't get it back in to turn it any further.

    Is there a special tool that I'm missing?

    Thanks!
  2. Bruce Johnson

    Bruce Johnson

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    Well, the correct tool is a long T-handled Allen wrench of the right size. You can get individual ones from tool suppliers, McMasters, etc. I have some of the 9" long ones for the standard sizes that I work with. They are long enough that the T handle ends up out beyond the end of the headstock. That makes the job simple and comfortable.

    For a quick emergency adjustment, use a regular L-shaped Allen wrench, but stick the long end into the truss rod. Then use something like a small adjustable wrench to clamp onto the short end of the L to turn it. Or find a piece of metal tubing that will slip over the short end of the L. But, be careful not to slip and gouge the headstock. Put a rag over the headstock under the wrenches.
  3. jacoby75

    jacoby75

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    Thanks, Bruce. I do have the long t-topped truss rod tool. Problem is the truss rod is set back too far in the slot (towards the back of the neck) to get the right angle to insert the truss rod. And with the allen wrench I have, it's too long to insert it so that the short end is sticking out to turn, and the slot for the truss rod is too narrow to turn the long side of the allen wrench.

    I'm thinking I need something that's like a mini allen wrench. Like half as long as a normal one or something.
  4. oleskool

    oleskool

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    I had this same problem with a peavey t20. There's a music school on Gratiot, North of 8Mile. The guy there had about every tool you could think of. I purchased about four or five different sizes for a few bucks. He brought out three shoeboxes full, I got the ones I was sure were different from what is in my toolkit. After all that nothing worked. I bit the bullet and called Peavey and shelled out the $20 for the original tool that came with the bass. <=== this is what I would do if I were you. I think peavey purposely makes it so if you don't have their tool you got problems. It could also be something dealing with the way they construct their necks. If you look, they sandwich the rod in. Two pieces the length of the neck. Joint line right down the center.
  5. Bruce Johnson

    Bruce Johnson

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    Do you have one of the ball-end Allen wrenches? The ball end will go into the hex socket at up to a 20 degree angle. On the standard L-shaped wrenches, the ball end is on the long leg, so you can use the trick with the wrench to turn it. You can also buy long T-handled Allen wrenches with the ball end.

    What does the original Peavey tool look like? I assume that it's some kind of a ball-end Allen wrench, right?

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