Vintage Basses

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by michricker, Dec 7, 2013.


  1. michricker

    michricker Supporting Member

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    Hello all. I have several really nice vintage basses, because I'm no where near a rich man so taking a huge financial loss would be tough if the market completely dropped.

    Basses:
    1966 Fender Precision - mint, burst color, all original
    1970 Rickenbacker 4001, 21 fret, all original, player wear, fire glo

    Amp:
    1961 Ampeg B15-N. All original good shape, navy flair tolex

    Seems like even the music kids listen to these days still relies on vintage bass tone. So not just the baby boomers appreciate cool vintage rock and roll instruments it appears.

    Do you think its smart to hold on to these for 10, 20 years? Or time to sell now or within next several years? What are the predictions from the TB community. Cheers.
     
  2. Webtroll

    Webtroll Rolling for initiative Supporting Member

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    If you need the money now, sell them. If you're playing them, keep them. I'm not sure I'd take future value into consideration.
     
  3. Bass Fund

    Bass Fund Banned

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    You don't sell holy grails, and you've got the trinity. Selling an old Fender is never a good idea, anyhow.
     
  4. Major Softie

    Major Softie

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    I wouldn't think there's any real chance of the market taking a big drop unless the entire world economy tanks enormously.

    During the "great recession" we've been in since around 07, prices on much of this kind of stuff has taken a little dip and hasn't gone up much in that time. Such periods of plateau are usually followed by periods of increase once the economy gets rolling again. So, I wouldn't think of selling them now if you're just looking to "get out at the right time." If you need cash right now, then sure, sell. But, if you're looking to get highest dollar, I'd hang on to them for a little longer.
     
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  6. godofthunder59

    godofthunder59 Supporting Member

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    Now is not a good time to sell, defiantly a buyers market. Will prices rise to the heights of pre 2008? That's hard to say I would hope for a bit of a rebound but that isn't going to happen till people feel good about the economy. If you don't HAVE to sell them and they mean something to you and they get played a bit I say keep 'em
     
  7. michricker

    michricker Supporting Member

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    Great feedback. My main player is a mtd635 and I don't really play these vintage basses. It's fun to own them though. Kinda my own little museum that I bring out from time to time for studio or jam at home.

    Just curious if I can depend on them for a long term investment. In 30 years will they be worth $3000, $30000 or even more. You never know. :)
     
  8. michricker

    michricker Supporting Member

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    More fun than money in the bank for sure. Cool conversation pieces. My Rick has been played on some platinum albums in years past and my ampeg was used in a Detroit studio way back by some of the Motown guys from the old studio engineer. I bought it from.
     
  9. godofthunder59

    godofthunder59 Supporting Member

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    These sound like keepers to me! Get a documented provenance on the pieces with history, that could very well add to their value. I have a Hiwatt DR201 that was part of Slades backline. It was one of Dave Hills, sadly I don't think that adds single dime to it's value. But it does to me.
     
  10. millsbass5

    millsbass5

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    Damn, you wouldn't happen to know where Jamerson's bass would be hiding, would you?
     
  11. michricker

    michricker Supporting Member

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    I wish I could get the history better documented. Only piece I have confirmed is Rick was used on kid rocks first two albums. Song "picture" with Sheryl Crowe you can clearly hear this old Rick tone. I bought it from their studio bassist. The ampeg I bought from an old Detroit studio engineer who had the ampeg since he took it from one of the studios. Wasn't Motown studios I believe but must have been a lesser know one. He showed me these cool old pictures when I went to buy it from him. I wish I would have made copies now. :(
     
  12. drummer5359

    drummer5359 Gold Supporting Member

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    There is no use in hanging on to them...


    Ship them to me and I'll dispose of them for you. ;)
     
  13. Vintagefiend

    Vintagefiend I don't care for 410 cabinets at all.

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    it was either. Sheryl Crow or Kid himself who played bass on picture, iirc
     
  14. smcd

    smcd Supporting Member

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    As has been mentioned, it's a buyer's market, so now is a terrible time to sell. It's impossible to predict value, but don't count on this nice gear being worth a boatload of money down the road. On one hand, they're not making any more '66 Pbasses. On the other hand, the buyers for expensive gear (baby boomers) are passing away, and younger people don't have the nostalgic attachment to vintage instruments, and are unlikely to pay high prices for them.

    People who bought gear as investments in 2005 lost their shirt in 2008. Buyers who thought prices would continue to climb paid $18grand for basses that are worth $7grand today. Just enjoy what you have now, and never mind value.
     
  15. P Town

    P Town Guest

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    If long term monetary gain is your objective, you would most likely be better off selling them, and putting the money in your retirement fund.
     
  16. Jim Carr

    Jim Carr Dr. Jim Gold Supporting Member

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    A few nice old instruments make poor investments, but great music. Play them, enjoy them, or sell them if the times demand it.

    I have a couple of instruments that have been with me for nearly 40 years. Selling them would be painful.

    However, I recently traded my '69 P-bass for a CS Jazz relic. I didn't played the P-bass much any more, even though I have owned it for over a decade. play the Jazz all the time.

    Assets like old instruments generally appreciate, though they are vulnerable to fire, theft, etc. Are you carrying musical instrument insurance? IME, most home owners/renters insurance will resist paying claims if you gig once in a while for pay, because they can consider you a "professional," i.e., one who gets paid to play—and classify you as being a higher risk.
     
  17. michricker

    michricker Supporting Member

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    Cool. Like I said only have hearsay from original owners no 100% confirmed stories unfortunately. But a likelihood some are true which is cool enough for me. I'll hang on to them. I doubt with the world becoming smaller, some folks in the world will have a desire for vintage 60's stuff for years to come so ill cross fingers that these don't become a thing of the past and loose all their value.
     
  18. MIMike

    MIMike

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    I think it depends on where you are in life. I just sold a few things to pay for something else i really wanted. i had my 64 P for about 15 years and just sold it last spring. I had not been playing the bass at all, and I was able to buy a pontoon boat that i had a blast on every weekend all summer. Like you said, it's better than money in the bank as long as the market doesn't crash again, and if you're using them' that's awesome...they should be used.
     
  19. michricker

    michricker Supporting Member

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    Hey mimike. A coincidence was thinking of a pontoon too. I live on lake orion north of Detroit. My pontoon is 20 years old. So one of these upcoming years part of my bass collection will be sold for a new boat. Just thinking of waiting a year or two for hopeful better prices. :). I'll have a hard time letting these old pieces go. The 66 p bass has to be one of the cleanest in the world. People can't believe it's almost 50 years old. It's almost too nice to play regularly. Would almost rather have money and a good beat up player I could take out.
     
  20. Vintagefiend

    Vintagefiend I don't care for 410 cabinets at all.

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    ha! my daughter and ex-wife live in Ortonville. Her aunt and uncle live in Lake Orion...was just up there for Thanksgiving. Small world. Nce community.
     
  21. blindrabbit

    blindrabbit Supporting Member

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    True, but I wouldn't depend upon them. I have a Wayne Gretzky rookie card that I keep because it is cool to have. At points in time it has been worth tens of thousands I'm sure, but it isn't right now. I've never thought of it as a financial asset, more of a neat thing to have up on the wall down the line. I think the basses are best viewed the same way. Maybe they will be worth $30k someday, or maybe it'll be $3k, or maybe $300. Who knows. Enjoy them for what they are now. :)
     

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