what does "mA" mean?

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by bassman_al, May 14, 2010.


  1. bassman_al

    bassman_al Supporting Member

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    I have a used Pandora Korg PX3B that I just got. Manual says use a 9v AC adapter if you want wall power. manual says use one that is rated 300-500mA. I have one that is rated for that, and another that is rated 200mA. They both seem to work, and both are 9v adapters. Are they both safe to use with this unit? Thanks.
     
  2. duderasta

    duderasta

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    milliAmps, the smaller one may not provide enough current under full load
     
  3. B.C.

    B.C.

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    Amps are the measure of electrical current. Milli amps are .001 amps and are typically what pedals draw. Current is drawn, meaning the pedal will only take as many amps as it needs, so if a pedal draws say 50 mA, a power supply needs to be able to source atleast 50 mA to work. Hope this helps :)
     
  4. whatitstrue

    whatitstrue

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    When it comes to Milli amps you always want the adapter to be equale to or preferibly exceed the minumum Milli amps recomendation. Never under rate the adapter to the device, although it may work this can cause Heat issues(possibly a fire with extended use).

    It is not safe to use the 200 if its rated 300-500.
     
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  6. bassman_al

    bassman_al Supporting Member

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  7. dannybuoy

    dannybuoy

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    A mA, or milliamp, is 1/1000th of an amp, a measure of the flow of electrical current. It helps to think of electricity as water flowing down a pipe - the voltage is like the water pressure, the current (mA) is the amount of water flowing, and the resistance is the width of the pipe. Too much voltage can burn out your electronics, just like too much water pressure can burst your pipes. But you can safely use a supply with a higher mA rating than you need, it just means you have more water on tap if it's needed!
     
  8. BassInUrFace

    BassInUrFace

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    thats all correct. close the thread.
     
  9. Chronicle

    Chronicle

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    Why don't people use google anymore? :(
     
  10. moles

    moles

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    Why don't people read the responses already posted anymore?
     
  11. bassman_al

    bassman_al Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the responses. I'll close the thread but I have to say that some of the later posts were unnecessarily snippy. I tried to google this topic and came up with nothing usable for my specific question. I always google first. Everyone's time is valuable, and I don't like to waste yours or mine.
     
  12. bassman_al

    bassman_al Supporting Member

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    I am not seeing an option to close this thread, so I'll the mods do it if they feel it is necessary.
     

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