What gauge for f#

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Anonymous7, Apr 3, 2014.


  1. Anonymous7

    Anonymous7

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    I realize the limited usages of tunings this low but I've but looking at garry goodmans flatwound subcontra strings any I was just wondering what gauge would I need for f# at a 34" scale
     
  2. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    Houston Tx
    As big and as high tension you can find at 34" scale
     
  3. knuckle_head

    knuckle_head

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    Jul 30, 2002
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    Seattle
    Disclosures:
    Owner; Knuckle Guitar Works & Circle K Strings
    Depends on the E and B strings and your tension preferences - anywhere from .175 to .200
     
  4. Thomas Kievit

    Thomas Kievit Thou shall not F*** up the groove Supporting Member

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    May 19, 2012
    I would go for .185, right in the middle ;)

     
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  6. ixlramp

    ixlramp

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    Jan 25, 2005
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    UK
    With a light technique or tapping you could go as thin as .160 and gain benefits of a thinner more flexible string, thats similar tension to a .120 B.
     
  7. FunkMetalBass

    FunkMetalBass

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    Endorsing Artist: J.C. Basses
    Keep in mind that Gary offers both extremely flexible and extremely stiff versions of the various gauges (at least for his rounds). Moreover, flats are considerably less flexible than their round counterparts, so you'd probably want a lower gauge than what you'd get in rounds.

    I'd email Gary directly. If you have a particular favorite gauge and type of flatwounds, include that in your question so that he can figure out how to compare it.
     
  8. Bassgeer

    Bassgeer Supporting Member

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    Location:
    Canada
    Sorry to derail:

    I am interested in trying out a F# at some point, but I only have a 34 inch scale bass atm. Would the F# have reasonable clarity if I got the proper gauge Circle K? I am running a 145 B right now (tuned to A). Or will it sound terrible?
     
  9. Stick_Player

    Stick_Player Banned

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  10. Jay2U

    Jay2U Not as bad as he lóòks Supporting Member

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    The frequency is only 23.125 Hz. The design of the pickup(s) may (but does not have to) limit the possibilities. I once saw the output signal of a bass tuned to a low G. The higher harmonics were louder than the base frequency.
     
  11. Thomas Kievit

    Thomas Kievit Thou shall not F*** up the groove Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2012
    .145 is very good for tuning it down to A, nothing wrong with that. It's better to use a heavy gauge when you tune down cause of the string tension that goes DOWN. Light(er) string gauges will make your string(s) go floppy when you play. In my opion, a .140 is a good gauge if you want a solid low B string. .145 / .150 is a good gauge to tune down to A :) For the F#, I think it's wise to get yourself a F# string, probably around .180 - .185 gauge. Tuning down from B to F# is useless.

     
  12. knuckle_head

    knuckle_head

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    Owner; Knuckle Guitar Works & Circle K Strings
    This is true of all bass notes on any bass of any scale length.
     
  13. Thomas Kievit

    Thomas Kievit Thou shall not F*** up the groove Supporting Member

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    May 19, 2012
    Knuckle_head, I was wondering if low(er) tunings can have cause some issues for pickups.

    I'm not an expert for this kind of things, but is it possible that for example dual coil humbucking pickups can pick up those lowness better than a P or J style pickup?

     
  14. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    Different pickups may produce a stronger low frequency than others, but it has more to do with how they are wound than the type of pickup they are. The biggest limiting factor will be cab design, to go to that low of a frequency you will need a cab tuned to go that low and a speaker that can handle it.
     
  15. Thomas Kievit

    Thomas Kievit Thou shall not F*** up the groove Supporting Member

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    May 19, 2012
    Great! So except for the amount of speakers, I guess the wattage is importnant as well?

     
  16. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    Excursion, sensitivity, and cab design more than wattage. It may be a good question to ask in the amps forum. There are plenty of people that know more about it than I do.
     
  17. Jay2U

    Jay2U Not as bad as he lóòks Supporting Member

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    It's also the placement of the pickups. The closer they are to the bridge, the more harmonics they pick up.
     
  18. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    True, but thats not something that can easily be changes on a completed bass.
     
  19. GODSBASSMAN

    GODSBASSMAN

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    So...Gary Goodman is the only man willing to go that BIG? He is strickly a custom string maker according to his website and one must know everything about their wanted string. I have a 7 string fretless that is tuned in 4ths from F# to high C and right now happily using a 6 string flatwound GHS precision flatwound set and desire a 175-185 flatwound to match. I have a 182 Kalium F# at this time..round wound that works but does not match.
     
  20. millsbass5

    millsbass5

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    Logan,W.V.(not up some holler)
    Damn. Just yank some cables off of the Golden Gate Bridge.
     
  21. knuckle_head

    knuckle_head

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    Jul 30, 2002
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    Seattle
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    Owner; Knuckle Guitar Works & Circle K Strings
    Interestingly, the more over-wound a pickup is the less well it reproduces lows. Humbucking is fine but the hotter it is wound the higher the impedance the pickup has. Low impedance deals with lows best. The lower the impedance the less volume so I guess humbucking would be ideal as the signal is going to have to be boosted at the preamp stage.
     
    Thomas Kievit and Levin like this.

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