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What order to learn The Beatles?

Discussion in 'Recordings [BG]' started by Journey55, Jan 8, 2013.


  1. Journey55

    Journey55 Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2011
    Melbourne, Florida
    Hello all,
    I got The Beatles Complete Scores book for Christmas so I figured I might as well learn them all (some people say Macca's the best bassist ever so maybe I can learn a thing or two lol). The only problem is that I don't know where to start....should I start chronologically, alphabetically, alphabetically by album, or some other pattern? Any suggestions would be appreciated
     
  2. Matt R.

    Matt R. Supporting Member

    Jul 18, 2007
    Huntsville AL
    Start with what you like best. I have that book as well. Great resource.
     
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  4. Staredge

    Staredge

    Aug 7, 2010
    Germantown, MD
    Pick up the book. Open to a page. Find the beginning of the song. Learn. Lather. Rinse. Repeat. :bassist:
     
  5. I'd start with the earliest stuff and work through chronologically. Remember that Paul wasn't a bassist to start out so I'd think it would be very cool to actually see how he progressed.
     
  6. jmverdugo

    jmverdugo

    Oct 11, 2012
    Katy TX
    I'd start with Eleanor Rigby, the baseline is remarkable easy.
     
  7. Shakin-Slim

    Shakin-Slim

    Jul 23, 2009
    Tokyo, Japan
    +1
     
  8. skwee

    skwee

    Apr 2, 2010
    Minneapolis
    A couple of years ago my wife got me a Beatles fakebook. I just flip through randomly and play through tunes that come up. Good exercise!
     
  9. atomicdog

    atomicdog

    Jun 18, 2011
    Start with a couple of early songs (Money, Do You Want Know a Secret or the like) and work your up through a mid-career tune or two and then on to Sgt. Peppers or Come Together of something from the last couple of albums.
     
  10. I'm a looser is a great example of some of McCartney's early melodic playing.

    Looser, Saw her Standing there, Something, oh Darling, Mean Mr Mustard medley, Rain, Drive my Car, to mention a few classics
     
  11. SirMjac28

    SirMjac28 Patiently Waiting For The Next British Invasion Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 25, 2010
    The Great Midwest
    +1 It is fun to listen to how he developed from Kansas City /Hey Hey Hey to a Day In The Life.
     
  12. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Great book for study & fun.
    I have had mine for years...have some/most/all the typos been corrected? Man, it's full of 'em.
     
  13. Basstreble

    Basstreble

    Dec 28, 2012
    Like what everyone else said: start with some of the earlier songs. Paul wasn't as advanced as he was once he recorded Revolver. Also you can play just of the roots of the songs at first, and then add in all of the fills once you've gotten used to it. That is what Paul did when he recorded. He spent many hours overdubbing.
     
  14. ToBorNottoB

    ToBorNottoB Banned

    Jan 9, 2013
    anything you can learn from Paul would be a good music lesson.
     
  15. Journey55

    Journey55 Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2011
    Melbourne, Florida
    I was leaning towards this for that very reason, I just wanted to see what input you TBers could provide, thanks!
     
  16. VSUBass

    VSUBass

    May 27, 2014
    Disclosures:
    Closures are dumb, stupid & not very smart
    I don't have The Complete Scores yet I'm just starting with the Red Album (1962-1966) which I understand has some mistakes in it but I figure that figuring out the mistakes will be good for my Buddha-Awful ear! :D But just looking at the truncated song list it's fascinating to see/hear the evolution of PM. The 1st ones could be classified as "Root-5th's with a Few Runs" and a couple of "Quasi Walking Bass with a Few Runs". Then the growing appearance of what I saw somewhere called something like "The Pop-Rock Bass Rhythm" which is "dotted Quarter, Eighth" then variations but usually ending the measure with an Eighth note IIRC. Once I became aware of it I started seeing it everywhere. Then the appearance of quintessentially Paul licks as in "Drive My Car" & "Day Tripper." And earlier (I think) on "And I Love Her" he uses what could be called a partial chords, i.e. 2-note sections.

    As Chris Berman used to say: This just in: Paul McCartney is a pretty darn good bass player! :bassist::hyper:
     
  17. mellowinman

    mellowinman Free Man Supporting Member

    Oct 19, 2011
    Minneapolis
    Start with Paul, then George, then John, and save Ringo for last. He's the hardest one to learn.
     
  18. Ralph Notoro

    Ralph Notoro Banned

    Jul 14, 2014
    Top to bottom, then bottom to top.

    You won't get all of it note for note. In fact, when you go back and review they'll be surprises for many years to come. Mac is a genius without an ounce of flash.
     
  19. I need that book.

    If it were me, I'd start with my favorite song, that being "PLease Please Me."
     
  20. just learn the ringo stuff, forget the rest
     



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