what should i look for in a violin? (beginner)

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by TinyE, Apr 2, 2014.


  1. TinyE

    TinyE

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    i'm thinking about adding a violin to our band, and don't really want to spend a ton of money, and of course, I want to get the most out of my dollar.

    are there specific things I should look at in these cheaper violins?
    what is the difference in 1/2, 3/4 and full size?
     
  2. TinyE

    TinyE

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    aha... google will get me a long ways.

    so, forget sizes.
    info on brands (cheap ones), info about bows, strings, etc... all of that would be great to know!
    thx
     
  3. georgiagoodie

    georgiagoodie It's all fun&games 'til the flying monkeys show up Supporting Member

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  4. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

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    I know nothing about violins, but I know rondo sells em. Might be worth starting off super cheap in case you hate it.
     
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  6. Basshappi

    Basshappi

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    Don't know where you are located but most cities have rental shops for orchesteral instruments. This might be the best way to go until you are sure you want to stick with it. They often sell older stock from time to time, one can get decent deals on instruments of reasonable quality. Such shops usually have good setup and repair services as well.
     
  7. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member

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    Rent for a while. "Adding a violin" typically involves adding a violinist.

    Find out if there's a Suzuki string program or something similar in your locale, and ask a teacher where students get their instruments. There may be somebody in your locale who handles them, but is not a regular music store.

    At the rock bottom student level, important features are: Intactness, functioning pegs and fine tuners, non-painted fingerboard, and a decent bow with real horsehair.
     

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