What to do after sand (back of) the neck?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by ydnac robert, Mar 29, 2014.


  1. ydnac robert

    ydnac robert

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    My 1977 Fender P’s neck's (back of it) finish were fell off (some of it). Created some kind of wrinkle wrap behind my neck.. made it felt not nice, I hate it.
    I just sanded it yesterday and now the neck felt smooth and superb for me, although maybe I have also removed it’s protector coat (?).

    My question is:
    What should I do to the (back of) the neck now after I sanded it?

    Thank You in advance.



    (I’m a long time lurker here, and Sorry for my english limitation).
  2. ExTek

    ExTek

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2014
    Maybe you can try Tru-Oil!
  3. ydnac robert

    ydnac robert

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    1. Should I really do it? How if I just let it be without any treatment? will it damage or what?
    2. I'm not in USA. I don't think Tru Oil is available here. Is there any substitute of it?
  4. JIO

    JIO Gold Supporting Member

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    northern CA
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    musician/artist/owner - Gildaxe
    I once asked the late Phil Kubicki (on the phone) what to use after sanding the back of the neck on my Factor - he recommended common baby-oil (Johnson & Johnson or whatever brand) Maple is pretty hard wood and doesn't need much of anything to seal/protect it and the baby oil gave it a nice smooth natural feel.
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  6. ydnac robert

    ydnac robert

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Thanks JIO.

    I have that Johnson & Johnson Baby Oil :)
    Now,
    How should I apply it to the neck?
    Should I apply that on regular daily basis? only need once? or...?
    One layer only? or...?
  7. JIO

    JIO Gold Supporting Member

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    musician/artist/owner - Gildaxe
    Put some on a cotton cloth and rub it up and down the back of the neck so as to evenly coat it. Let it soak in a bit and then use another cotton rag (old socks work well) to wipe off the excess - done. If your neck has a rosewood board, you also need to treat it so it doesn't dry out. (same method) If you have a guitar store near, fretboard dressing (not exactly sure its composition) is something they would sell. If not, just use the same baby-oil. Repeat as needed. (not daily) The oil seals the wood pores against undo moisture (humidity/sweat) and also keeps the wood from drying out. Warped necks can be caused by very dry wood as the wood becomes brittle/less elastic. You have 2 types of wood (maple/rosewood) doing their organic thing in individual ways. Think of it as care and feeding. ;)

    As a final note, the older the wood (like your 70's P) will grow more stable over time as long as this simple maintenance is done.
  8. ydnac robert

    ydnac robert

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Thanks again JIO. I'll do it now. :)

    How can we tell that the neck is already warped? I hope not, but I'm afraid if I have helped to make it warped already by leaving it untreated after sand it.
  9. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    Houston Tx
    untreated maple will turn grey and any dirt in your hands will make it very dirty. I personally would use something a bit more substantial than bay oil. Some kind of finishing oil should be available where you live at a hardware store.
  10. ydnac robert

    ydnac robert

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Thanks Hopkins.
    I'd like to, but I;m afraid to damage the bass with the chemical contained in the finishing oil.
    Can you tell me what are exactly the chemicals that may contained in such finishing oil that are dangerous to bass neck?
  11. JIO

    JIO Gold Supporting Member

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    no worries - it's not that sensitive, the wood is 37 yrs old. FTR - there's a lot of information/guides to check/adjust your neck (google "how to adjust action on a bass neck" - probably can find a youtube tutorial) and as long as the truss-rod works it can be adjusted if needed. If it's out more than a little and you don't feel confident tweaking it yourself - find a local luthier/guitar tech to give it a pro adjustment. A nice old Fender is worth the minimal expense for a correct set-up and you will enjoy playing it more.
  12. JIO

    JIO Gold Supporting Member

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    like this? feels silky smooth! :smug:

    [​IMG]
  13. ydnac robert

    ydnac robert

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Nice.

    It's how my bass neck looks now

    [​IMG]
  14. JoeWPgh

    JoeWPgh

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2012
    You should be able to get Tru-Oil on line from someone. On the other hand, if you don't mind a dirty looking neck, raw wood feels the best to my thumb.
  15. ydnac robert

    ydnac robert

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    I don't really mind it, but all I concern (and less knowledge I am) is the bad effect to the neck/wood itself.
    If it's (the effect) is ok, I can go with raw wood feels and (dirty) look.
  16. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    Location:
    Houston Tx
    The oil is made for finishing wood, the poly finish you sanded off had way harsher chemicals in it than oil. I use Formby's tung oil, but they are basically all just boiled linseed oil and varnish mix.
  17. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    Houston Tx
    Yeah, that looks nice with the bass its attached to though.
  18. JIO

    JIO Gold Supporting Member

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    it's a beautiful beast
  19. Humbled

    Humbled Supporting Member

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    Jul 28, 2013
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    East of the Sun
    JIO,

    That looks like the back of the neck of both my 1964 and 1965 P.

    Is that original, sanded, baby-oiled, some combination, or what ?
  20. ExTek

    ExTek

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2014
    I've never heard of baby oil on a neck. I've always heard people have good results with Tru-Oil (you should find an online dealer BTW) or tung oil. I think that is your best bet! Or you could just go all the way and spray it with lacquer or finish it in satin. I've done none of these, but I am planning to refinish my neck soon.
  21. JoeWPgh

    JoeWPgh

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2012
    Here's something I never understood. Typically, rosewood fingerboards are not sealed. And while the a oil/poly/lacquer/whathaveyou finish 'protects the wood', it's primary purpose is to seal the wood against moisture and the expansion/contraction moisture causes. Why would you protect one part against moisture, but not the other? When one side can take on moisture, and the other cannot, isn't that a recipe for warpage?

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