Your Favourite Military Book (Thread)

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Icey101, Jan 3, 2013.


  1. Icey101

    Icey101

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Location:
    Australia Victoria
    Add a short note why

    Mine is

    Shockwave
    The countdown to
    Hiroshima
    by
    Stephen Walker

    This book is incredible and tells the whole story around the bomb testing and development up to the drop....

    read it a few times and each time i read it i learn something else

    special note to another book:

    The Forgotton Soldier
    by
    Guy Sajer
    This is another incredible book about a 17 yr old german soldier fighting on the eastern front, some of the scenes described are hard to digest....if you look this book up some dispute how authentic it is, but its an amazing read
  2. Sublab

    Sublab

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Location:
    Belgium, Flanders
    Das Boot, Lothar gunther Buchheim.

    The writer himself made three patrols with a German sub in WW2, and the events thereof are moulded into one long story, with fictional characters based on the actual
    U-boat crew. It's the best anti war book I've read so far.
  3. Thick McRunfast

    Thick McRunfast Not just good, good enough Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon USA
    The Last Valley: Dien Bien Phu and the French Defeat in Vietnam by Martin Windrow. Published in 2004 the author had access to the most recently declassified French govt documents related to their involvement in Vietnam.

    Initially looks at politics of pre WWII Vietnam. An incredibly interesting book. Well written and readable.
  4. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    Houston Tx
    Parachute Infantry by David Kenyon Webster. Its the memoirs of an Easy Co. paratrooper. Its a very well written book about an average soldier in the 101st Airborn in WWII
  5. N.F.A.

    N.F.A. Supporting Member

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    Jun 25, 2009
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    Back on the chain gang!
  6. Jim Nazium

    Jim Nazium Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    Takoma Park, MD (DC)
    There are a lot of good ones, but I think my favorite is "Ghost Soldiers". It's the account of one of the first US Army Ranger missions, to rescue prisoners in a Japanese POW camp near the end of WWII. Tells the whole story of planning the mission, negotiating permission to carry it out, then actually doing it. Really gripping. Also pulls no punches detailing the horriffic conditions in the camp.
  7. Factor88

    Factor88

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Hard to pick just one, but Robert Massie's Castlesof Steel about the naval war in WWI is brilliantly written. Just the right amount of great original writing and historical qoutes.

    For a runner up, I would pick Bruce Catton's A Stillness at Appomattox, the third of Catton's 1950s era trilogy on the Civil War. I cannot understand why it is so hard to find Catton's books...with all due respect to the more easy to find Civil War books by Shelby Foote and James McPherson, Catton's books are a far more interesting and entertaining read in my opinon.

    By the way all the books above are non-fiction. Well-written non fiction to me is so far superior to war fiction, because the stuff actually happened.
  8. Marlat

    Marlat Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2002
    Location:
    London UK
    Most of the modern non-fiction are ghost written rubbish, but a modern fiction book that is very well written is Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes about the Vietnam War. Its a really good story written by someone who was there.
  9. dozicusmaximus

    dozicusmaximus

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    The only one I've read was The Bluejackets Manual.
  10. Unprofessional

    Unprofessional Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2012
    Yep. And, if you've watched HBO's Band of Brothers, you will recognize the Webster material that was included.
  11. paradog

    paradog

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2011
    Location:
    Central NJ
    We Were Soldiers Once and Young by J. Galloway and Lt Gen. H Moore 


    It Doesn't take a Hero by General H. Norman Schwarzkopf
  12. nickbass79

    nickbass79

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Location:
    North Carolina
    SOG by John L Plaster...Hands down the most intriguing Vietnam book I have read. It's about the MACVSOG teams that did cross border operations into Laos and Cambodia.

    Marine Sniper...About Carlos Hathcock.
  13. Sgt. Rock

    Sgt. Rock

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    The Second World War by Winston S. Churchill.
  14. jebmd

    jebmd

    Joined:
    May 4, 2009
    Location:
    Edgewater Maryland
    Blinds Man Bluff
    Halsey's Typhoon

    I love reading anything to do with the Navy especially submarines.
  15. guitar ed

    guitar ed

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Location:
    Campbell, KaliFornia
    The book I wish I could read is the original version of "War as I knew it" by GS Patton. I read the sanitized version instead.

    I have read a number of other military/history books that I have enjoyed.

    Take care,

    edg
  16. colcifer

    colcifer Esteemed Nitpicker Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2010
    Location:
    A Galaxy Far, Far Away
    Art of War
  17. Will Kelly

    Will Kelly

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Location:
    TX
    Breakout by Martin Russ

    Really an excellent book on the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir. Also, there is a documentary available on Netflix called Chosin which makes an excellent companion to the book... the documentary is stunning and left me speechless. Best documentary I've seen besides Standing in the Shadows of Motown.
  18. nickbass79

    nickbass79

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Location:
    North Carolina
    The Black Devils was a great book if your into WWII history. The 1st Special Service Group did some amazing things in Italy and the story of inception is pretty amazing.
  19. Lady Kayri

    Lady Kayri

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    Seven Pillars of Wisdom by TE Lawrence. One of the first to more or less codify guerilla warfare. At one point had about 30 books on TE, before I gave away most of them prior to a move. Now wish I hadn't, but at least Pillars is now on my Kindle...
  20. Webtroll

    Webtroll Rolling for initiative Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Years ago I read Hitler's Navy and enjoyed it. I had no idea their armed forces had so much trouble working together.

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