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Youth song choices to learn

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by sm49341, Nov 28, 2013.


  1. sm49341

    sm49341

    Joined:
    May 12, 2013
    Location:
    Michigan
    So I am trying to teach my 14 yr old daughter guitar. She now knows g Em and C. I told her she needs to workon switching between chords. it will come with repitition. I tell her it will be a month before she could play a song.
    But she has me listen to some songs she wants to play. Wow, all this modern music , this stuff is complicated. Most is drop d or alternate. Rhythmically too , very challenging. I'm like, look you need to learn more simple stuff starting out. She's like, oh the stuff you listen to . That's not really my music. The only tune she played that Seemed sensible was Ed Shareen The A Team
    I guess what I'm saying is for these youngsters, if they want to play what they're hearing and listen to, that's quite a climb. I wonder if many just give up.
    When I was young it was mellancamp and Fogerty and you were on your way!
     
  2. Milk

    Milk

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2013
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    What bands exactly does she want to play?

    I was lucky that way that all the bands i loved turned out to not be technical players (or not too much anyway).

    And it doesn't have to be "old boring music" she doesn't like that she has to learn on. It should never be when possible...Surely there's something more her cup of tea she could start with that's not too hard? If she likes heavy stuff, which sounds to me like she does, there's certainly something she doesn't hate she could learn that is fairly heavy without being complex. Also, she can simplify the rhythm early on. It doesn't have to be, "i have to play it this way exactly or not at all"...

    You have to be realistic about these things. And personally I don't think it's realistic to tell someone they'll be able to play a song within a month unless its like three chords campfire songs or something...and who wants to learn that (people who bring an acoustic at a campfire deserve to be smashed over the head with it, no, i DONT want to hear your ****** version of ****** songs and it doesn't make you cool or talented that you learned a few open chords)

    Definitely you have to be made aware early on the level of technical proficiency of the musicians you aspire to play like. She'll have to realise it probably takes years to get as good as her idols. Better be made aware of it sooner than later. The main reason why people quit learning an instrument is because they think it's gonna be just a few months learning...and then the mind numbing repetition hit them and they realise how long it takes to train your muscles.

    But yeah do maybe try to name the bands she likes, i might not be able to help, but some here might be able to recommend easier things of a similar style she might like to learn.

    I have to say, there's a reason why there's more electronic bands than ever. Young people nowadays are too much ADD to want to bother properly learning an instrument. Possibly also they have more freedom and things to do than ever, so it's not like they couldn't be doing anything "better" (not necessarily more productive) than sitting at home for hours playing the same chords over and over. When i started, i didn't have that many entertainment options, especially where i lived, that probably helped.
     
  3. sm49341

    sm49341

    Joined:
    May 12, 2013
    Location:
    Michigan
    Her fav band is Sleeping with Sirens. Pretty technical. I noticed that most songs she selected were drop d tuned. She likes Nirvana too. The one song of theirs she wants to play with is heart shaped box. Another d tuned song. I play several or their tunes and none I ever selected were drop d. I did fool with the heart shape box intro a couple years ago because it was cool but never jammed the whole thing.
    As for playing a song in a month, yeah I'm talking very simple jingle bells type of thing . I think it's important to give her a sense of accomplishment early.
    That being said I'm no real guitarist by any means, and I'm no teacher either. My plan is to get her knowing the popular open chords, simple qtr note strums, know the parts of the guitar, and seeing what kind of ear she has. And within a month getting some real instruction with actual instructors.
    Heck I could use lessons myself. Id rather spend money on her lessons tho
     
  4. BioWeapon

    BioWeapon

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2013
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    You can forget open position chords if you want her to play any SWS. I have played (guitar) some of their stuff before.

    I mean, unless she's doing a unique acoustic rendition or something.

    In which case, Yeah open position chords!
     
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  6. hrodbert696

    hrodbert696 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2010
    Location:
    Like old Hampshire, but New
    I'm wondering - I know it's not the typical approach, but why not just teach her in drop-D tuning? If that's what she likes, teach it to her. Just make sure she understands that it's not standard tuning, and as she moves along she should understand standard tuning too.
     
  7. sm49341

    sm49341

    Joined:
    May 12, 2013
    Location:
    Michigan
    I suppose she can do drop D if she wants, but we're talking a very beginner here. I guess I just want her to do standard tuning to start. And treat Drop D as an alternate. Like I say, she needs a real instructor, not me. I'm just doing a little primer and making sure the interest is there.

    Personally, Im not a huge fan of Drop D. Nothing wrong with it, this is just my taste. I think its an age thing. i didn't grow up with that sound. I don't care for the "Darkness" of it. But at the end of the day its her musical journey not mine. So its her choice. The teens I know that play seem drawn to the sound. Guess its a generational thing.
     
  8. BioWeapon

    BioWeapon

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2013
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Drop Tuning facilitates power chords and triplets :

    D---5--
    A---5--
    D---5--

    Instead of

    D---5--
    A---5--
    E---3--

    So you can bar with one finger. Also extends your triplet range down two half steps. Might actually be easier.
    But, OTOH, open position chords have notes shifted up two frets which could complicate things.
     
  9. BassCliff

    BassCliff

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Location:
    So. Cal.
    Hi,

    It's excellent that you are teaching your daughter. It's a bonding experience and a joy to share something you love with someone you love.

    I am also teaching my 14 year old daughter to play guitar. Thankfully she is a big Beatles fan. I bought her a Beatles songbook (the "Beatles 1" compilation) that has piano score and chord diagrams. We get together once a week and go over a couple songs. I teach her proper fingerings and strumming/rhythm techniques, and then she practices on her own. Sometimes I pull out my acoustic bass guitar and have an impromptu sing along. We'll start working on Christmas songs this weekend.

    I'm also trying to teach my daughter music theory along with teaching her songs. She needs a good musical foundation in order to hopefully progress beyond the skills that I have acquired. Time signatures, key signatures, note values, harmony, scales, etc, are all necessary for the well-rounded musician. It's great to be able to "play by ear" and have that reinforced with the theory to understand why it sounds good or bad.

    A applaud your effort and can only encourage you to find simpler tunes that she likes so that she gets the enjoyment of playing songs with you while she is also learning music.

    I started playing Creedence. It took me a while before I could play a Stanley Clarke tune. ;)


    Thank you for your indulgence,

    BassCliff
     
  10. BassCliff

    BassCliff

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Location:
    So. Cal.
    Hi,

    Not to be picky but a "triplet" is a rhythmic figure, not a harmonic structure. Are you referring to a "triad"? Open fifths are, indeed, power chords but not "triads".

    I'm not really a guitar player. Perhaps this is why your statement is unclear to me.


    Thank you for your indulgence,

    BassCliff
     
  11. Casting Thunder

    Casting Thunder

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Isn't that wonderwall song really easy?
     

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