Ed Conley
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A Functional, Easy Playing P Bass...

3/5, 3 from 3 reviews
Another bargain bass guitar from Glarry with awesome potential...
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Recent Reviews

  1. groovepump
    Glarry Fretless Bass
    2/5, 2 out of 5, reviewed Mar 31, 2021
    Tone:
    1.00/5,
    Build Quality:
    1.00/5,
    Features:
    3.00/5,
    Feel:
    5.00/5,
    Value:
    1.00/5,
    Pros
    • + Really nice fingerboard. It's the only good thing about the bass.
    Cons
    • - Strings, pickups, tuning machines are all junk. JUNK!
    • - Burleywood is like balsa wood. Screws cannot be torqued down without stripping the hole
    • - BY the time you fix all the quality issues you will have spent as much as buying a real bass.
    I have a Fretless Glarry in Burlywood. I will save you the time to read my entire observations (below): These are crap basses. Don't buy one.
    Why:
    1)The tuning machines are junk. Worm gear and toothed gear don't always mesh well and in my case, the D-string released string tension completely after a point. Couldn't tune D-string at all. impossible.
    2) The pickups are extremely noisy and have low-output. The pickups were not aligned with the strings, Completely wrong. Replaced immediately. The tone sucks.
    3) Wiring from pick-ups to vol and tone controls was a mess and had a lot of extra wire running around the components.
    The cavity where the pick-ups are mounted is routed too deep. This causes the distance between strings and magnets to be over 1 cm. I had to cut a wood piece to raise the floor of the cavity to get the pickups to under 5mm spacing to the strings.
    4) even with the pickups "raised", the alignment with the strings was always wrong because the string spacing did not match the magnet spacing at the point where Glarry routed and mounted the pickups. Splitting the difference in error requires shifting the pickups side-to side, which in turn requires you to hog out the pick guard opening, leaving big open gaps around the pickups.
    5) The entire cavity needs to be shielded, and the bridge ground wire needs to be solidly connected to this shielding. The internal wiring needs to be shortened-up.
    6) The strings are . . . a step up from baling wire. They totally suck. Might as well be kite strings. Replaced them immediately.
    7) The Burlywood body looks beautiful, and the finish is excellent. But Burlywood is so soft, the pick-guard and bridge screws are easily stripped when removing and replacing them during modification. 3 of the pick guard screws were already loose as they had been over tightened at the factory and could be pulled-out with your fingers. Burlywood is like Balsa wood. It literally is as soft as the styrofoam peanuts used in packaging. I found this out when I tried to route a shallow guide beneath the bridge for a piezo pickup wire exit. The varnish was harder than the wood. I routed the "groove" with a straight screwdriver ( 1/8" blade) and had to be careful to NOT go to deep. The wood is as easy to dig into as a styrofoam peanut, or a piece of toast. No wonder the screws don't stay put. JUNK!
    8) The one thing I did like about the bass was the fingerboard. The feel of the neck and fingerboard was excellent (to me). The rest of the bass is horrible and Glarry should be ashamed to offer these for sale.

    Some people like Glarry basses "as-is". I can't imagine what kind of players they are, or what kind of music they play, but I haven't been able to gig this new bass yet (3 months old) because I need to keep fixing it. I've spent as much as the price of a new Squier Affinity bass. I have two Squier Jazz basses, and I gig them all the time. They are a thousand times the quality and play-ability of these stupid Glarry paper weights.
    As I said in my other review, DON'T DO IT! Save your money. Buy something else. Anything Else.
    I'll end here before I tell you how I really feel . . .
    Price Paid:
    $99 bass + replacement pickups + tuners + strings + copper tape = $270
  2. groovepump
    Great bass, if tweeked a little
    2/5, 2 out of 5, reviewed Dec 1, 2020
    Tone:
    2.00/5,
    Build Quality:
    2.00/5,
    Features:
    3.00/5,
    Feel:
    4.00/5,
    Value:
    2.00/5,
    Pros
    • + inexpensive
    • + light weight
    • + great finish
    Cons
    • - strings and pickups need replacing, immediately. Total junk.
    • - Fret end very sharp. NEED to be filed down. OUCH!
    • - Tuning machines need replacing. Gears don't mesh properly. Junk hardware.
    I own a fretted AND fretless Glarry P-bass,
    I own 5 basses (de-fretted Ibanez, Fender 5 and 4 string jazz basses)
    My little Glarry has become my primary gigging bass, and I have it at every show.
    BUT---
    My review needs to be qualified. (this rating was downgraded after gigging this bass for a few months. Now I give it a "2")
    The bass body, neck, and finish are excellent. The bass is very light. Nice for 3 hour shows.
    But as it arrives, out of the box:
    Strings suck. Dead. Pickups are very noisy. 60Hz hum and electrical noise are overwhelming.
    There are dead notes, and I didn't try to identify the reason.
    Out of the box, it is unusable (my opinion) for any kind of performing. This earns it 1-star.
    HOWEVER---
    The bass cost only me $65 or $70 on Amazon. You get what you pay for.
    So, I copper shielded the entire inside cavity and pick guard with copper tape.
    I replaced the pickups with "real" Fender classic '62 pickups ($65) and replaced the strings with
    La Bella nylon tape wound (750N), and adjusted the action a tad (it was already very good).
    Now the bass is quiet, has great tone, is fun to play, and is easy to wear for hours at a show.
    Sounds like a real P-bass.
    So, for under $200, I have a nice-looking bass that has all the tone of a P-bass. That gets it the 5-stars. I love this bass now. It's my most-played bass.

    3-30-2021: Revised assessment.... I found-out why the tuning machines are so sicky and weird (at times) to tune. The worm gear and toothed gear in the tuners don't always mesh well. They're actually CRAP. The tuning machines need replacing immediately with this bass. Oil will NOT help them. I ordered Fender tuners because I feared that the other "cheap" tuners on Amazon may be similar "junk" from China. At least the Fender type are a known quantity. Another $50 puts the price of upgrading the bass over that of buying a Squier Affinity bass, which is a helluva lot better bass by a huge margin. My final conclusion is-- If you plan to use this bass to play out, buy something else. I will NOT buy another Glarry. They take too much time and upgrading to be worthwhile. You WILL learn a lot by fixing them--- you'll have to. You'll spend a lot of time and money and end up with a bass that has zero resale value and marginal gig-ability. Save your money. I'll review the Fretless Glarry separately.
    Price Paid:
    $65 + strings, pickups, tuning machines = $230
  3. Ed Conley
    Another Bargain Bass From Glarry Music with Awesome Potential...
    5/5, 5 out of 5, reviewed Jul 14, 2020
    Tone:
    4.00/5,
    Features:
    4.00/5,
    Feel:
    5.00/5,
    Value:
    5.00/5,
    Pros
    • + A playable P-Bass you can do anything with and not worry about it!
    Cons
    • - None really.
    Five stars for the excellent value this bass guitar represents. I've played this bass out, and outside of a few gearheads, no one even noticed it was not one of the ubiquitous brands of P-Bass out there. They just all knew it sounded great! Just like the Glarry Jazz I previously reviewed, it would be a great student starter as you won't lose (much) money if they give up on you. On the other end of the scale, I'm a professional, and I love to play mine! So inexpensive, it's ridiculous value for the money. I'll include a link of a You Tube review of it.
    Price Paid:
    $79.99

Bass Details

  1. No. of Frets:
    20
    Construction:
    Bolt-On
    Active or Passive:
    Passive
    Scale Length:
    34"
    No. of Strings:
    4
    Body Material:
    Basswood
    Neck Material:
    Maple
    Body Finish:
    Black, White pick guard.
    Nut Width:
    1.656
    Fingerboard Material:
    Rosewood
    Bridge:
    Fixed Bridge
    Pickups:
    One split coil, P Bass style.
    Other Hardware:
    Steel.
    Weight:
    6.72 lbs.
    EQ / Controls:
    One volume, one tone.
    Price:
    $79.99
    https://www.glarrymusic.com/glarry-precision-electric-bass-guitar-p7.html 17002957_1_800_800[1].jpg
    Specifications:

    Brand:Glarry
    Style:Bass
    Orientation:Right handed
    Color:White; Black; Red; Yellow; Blue; Sunset; Burlywood;Dark Blue;
    Number of frets:20
    Nut width:1.656 in.
    Scale length:34"
    Number of Strings(Roundwound):4
    Four Strings Diameter:G-0.045", D-0.065", A-0.08", E-0.1"
    Pick-up Style:Split Single-Coil Pickup
    Guitar Bridge System:Fixed
    Controls:1 x Volume, 1 x Tone
    Body Material:Basswood
    Neck Material:Maple
    Fingerboard Material:Rosewood
    Dimensions:(45.66 x 12.99 x 2.75)"(L x W x H)
    Weight:6.72lb
    Package Includes:
    Tags:

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