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1000mA vs 1700mA

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by catcauphonic, Dec 20, 2017.


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  1. catcauphonic

    catcauphonic High Freak of the Low Frequencies Supporting Member

    Mar 30, 2012
    Seattle WA
    Price victory on eBay currently goes to the Pig Hog >
    Screenshot_20171220-213929.

    The only difference I'm seeing in the description here (other than the PH being able to power 10 pedals vs the OS's 8, and the OS including adapters) is something about the 1000mA vs 1700mA.

    Is that number important?

    Any pros and cons of either I should know about??

    Description of the PH>
    Screenshot_20171220-214155.

    Description of the OS>
    Screenshot_20171220-214027.

    Anything else I need to know to best get my board started?

    Thanx
     
  2. Mo'Phat

    Mo'Phat Supporting Member

    Oct 1, 2003
    San Diego, CA, USA
    mA is pretty much the most important number. It's how many amps the adaptor can send to your pedals before melting or exploding or whatever they do.

    So, you need to add up the amp draw from all of your pedals - on AND off - and if you are drawing more than 1 amp, then you should get the one that can power 1.7.
     
  3. catcauphonic

    catcauphonic High Freak of the Low Frequencies Supporting Member

    Mar 30, 2012
    Seattle WA
    Hi, thanks for your reply, though I'm still not clear on which number best suits my needs to chain a few pedals on a board :bag: The pedals in question (so far) are these ... which I believe to be pretty uniform in their needs.

    20171223_101223.

    In this case does the one rated at 1700mA (capable of powering 10 pedals) make better sense than the one at 1000mA (capable of powering 8 pedals?)

    Are you talking about frying the charger or the device(s) its powering?

    :help:
     
  4. ddnidd1

    ddnidd1 Supporting Member

    Don't pay any attention to the marketing smoke about how many pedals can be powered.

    Research each of your pedals and find out how much power each draws - then add that all up.

    The power required for each pedal will be listed as ma's (millamps).

    You need a power supply that can provide more ma's than your pedals will draw in total.
     
    Gearhead17 likes this.
  5. Johnny Mac

    Johnny Mac Riff-finder General Supporting Member

    Sep 28, 2005
    Springfield, MA
    Both power supplies are capable of powering a theoretically infinite number of pedals, as long as the current draw (the mA's) of each pedal added up does not exceed the current provided by the power supply. The chain provided may only have eight or ten slots, but you can buy more to extend them.

    In your case, I think either should provide more than enough, but more current is generally preferable to less, so if you plan on adding more pedals I'd probably opt for the 1700mA supply - though, if you add much more, you'll probably run into noise issues and you'll probably want to get an isolated power supply brick.
     
    catcauphonic likes this.
  6. Johnny Mac

    Johnny Mac Riff-finder General Supporting Member

    Sep 28, 2005
    Springfield, MA
    This video does a good job of explaining how power works with pedals. Pretty long (though shorter than many of their other episodes), but definitely worth watching:

     
    catcauphonic likes this.
  7. Mo'Phat

    Mo'Phat Supporting Member

    Oct 1, 2003
    San Diego, CA, USA
    For your 4 pedals, either power supply should work just fine. To find current draw, just google search (your pedal) specs.

    I searched Aguilar Agro Specs and came up with the user manual (http://www.aguilaramp.com/pdf/AGROPedalManual.pdf) that shows current draw at 7 mA. So, you could string together like 140 of these and still be okay with the 1 amp supply.

    The single-effect boxes are normally a non-issue. You can run into amp problems if you are powering a multi-effect or something with a lot of digital processing.

    Keep in mind - your pedals are really only drawing amperage when they're engaged. So even if you load up 20 pedals on a board and are getting close to the transformer's limit, you should still be good unless you have all of the pedals engaged.
     
    catcauphonic likes this.
  8. Bassamatic

    Bassamatic keepin' the beat since the 60's Supporting Member

    Either one will certainly work. You would need the bigger one for a large number of pedals or something that is a current hog.
     
    catcauphonic likes this.
  9. catcauphonic

    catcauphonic High Freak of the Low Frequencies Supporting Member

    Mar 30, 2012
    Seattle WA
    So how much is the draw for each of these pedals, + any future additions, is the big question. I need to look up the specs, but which set of hieroglyphics do I need to focus on? :rolleyes:
     
  10. Mo'Phat

    Mo'Phat Supporting Member

    Oct 1, 2003
    San Diego, CA, USA
    When you find the specs, hit CTRL+F and type in mA. That should take you to the current draw or current consumption or power requirements of the pedal. Some pedals might not actually say, but will tell you what size adaptor you will need. I nearly always (conservatively) estimate that normal, single-effect stompboxes take no more than 50 mA. Digital pedals and multi effects take more.
     
    Gearhead17 and catcauphonic like this.
  11. ddnidd1

    ddnidd1 Supporting Member

    If you READ the responses to your question you'll have your answer.
     
  12. catcauphonic

    catcauphonic High Freak of the Low Frequencies Supporting Member

    Mar 30, 2012
    Seattle WA
    Ahh, I saw this after I wrote my last post. Very informative and in easy terms.
    Now I see clearly. So the Pig Hog (1000mA) would be sufficient so long as none of the incoming pedals have a larger difference in draw. Got it.

    The One Spot likely is rated at 1700mA because their kit includes adapters for multi effects processors and other oddball stuff, yea?
     
  13. Mo'Phat

    Mo'Phat Supporting Member

    Oct 1, 2003
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Their ratings are based on the components they're built with. If the adapter can withstand more amperage, that's what they're rated for. Has nothing really to do with the kit and extras. It's all in the body of the wall-wart plug. One-Spot is made with more hardy/substantial components than the Pig Hog, which is made with more hardy/substantial components than a Boss PSA-120 which is rated at 500 mA.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2017
    catcauphonic likes this.
  14. You can pretty much omit the tuner pedal from the total, because it's only going to be drawing power when it's on & when it's on all the other pedals won't be working as hard.
    but if you want to be extra safe from an overload, by all means add them all up

    just look for Amps used for each pedal
     
    catcauphonic likes this.
  15. catcauphonic

    catcauphonic High Freak of the Low Frequencies Supporting Member

    Mar 30, 2012
    Seattle WA
    It's all making much better sense now. Thanks for that linked video and all the responses, which came flooding in at once while I was typing a follow up question and pumping gas at the same time. Much appreciated!
     
  16. catcauphonic

    catcauphonic High Freak of the Low Frequencies Supporting Member

    Mar 30, 2012
    Seattle WA
    You're right. And I very likely won't be running multiple effects at the same time, either (though maybe down the line.)

    So according to @Mo'Phat's formula of 'conservatively estimating that each individual box uses 50mA' should mean that the Pig Hog at 1000mA could theoretically power 20 pedals that are always on?? That sounds like plenty of juice (not accounting for noise or other issues that would make that number of always on pedals prohibitive.)
     
    Killed_by_Death likes this.
  17. It pays to research and be a frugal shopper but don't penny pinch yourself into a corner, and it is important to be flexible and have a backup. I have been using 1spots for a long time without issue and have a couple similar to the hog for smaller boards and backup.

    The 1spot combo pack includes the adapter plugs that may come in handy as your collection grows as there are many vintage pedals that use different plugs or may not have an adapter function at all. .
     
    catcauphonic likes this.
  18. I personally would recommend the 1Spot as it gives you more power for when you choose to expand your Pedal library.
    Also, it switches from 110-240v on its own which basically means that you don't have to worry about playing a gig anywhere on the planet as long as you have the required flat/round/angled pin converter.
    As for the additional plug converters provided with the combo pack, they could be useful for when you need to power a pedal with an eccentric power requirement.
    Needless to say, research goes a long way. Know what you need and purchase wisely.
     
    catcauphonic likes this.
  19. kat888

    kat888 Guest

    Oct 13, 2015
    catcauphonic likes this.
  20. catcauphonic

    catcauphonic High Freak of the Low Frequencies Supporting Member

    Mar 30, 2012
    Seattle WA
    Appreciate the last 3 replies as input.

    This morning, I sprang for the Pig Hog since i figure my pedal expansion rate will likely happen slowly, so it should be more than enough for a while (and I see those common adapters seem to run between $5.99-7.99 ea.)

    IF in the future I get to the point of needing more flexibility with it, I'd likely buy a One Spot and keep the PH as the backup.

    It should arrive on the 29th ... if I have any issues with it, y'all here will be in front of the line to know about it :smug:
     

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