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15amp Power Conditioner enough?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by babyhuey, Oct 7, 2005.


  1. babyhuey

    babyhuey

    Sep 16, 2005
    AR
    I'm looking at getting the QSC PLX 1602 power amp. The specs say
    10A at 1/8 power. Would a 15A power conditioner be enough for it and a SVP-Pro? It kinda makes me nervous if its pulling 10A at just 1/8 power.
    Its making me think about the RMX 1850HD instead. Its only 6A at 1/8 power. Thanks for the help!
     
  2. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    Find out what it pulls at full power, the same for anything else you're running through it, and double it. That's the capacity you need.
     
  3. babyhuey

    babyhuey

    Sep 16, 2005
    AR

    Really? I haven't seen any power conditioners over 20A
     
  4. That's cause you won't find normal 110 circuits over 20A. A power conditioner over 20A is wasted capacity, cause if it pulls more than 20A continuous it'll blow the bar/house circuit breaker at the panel.

    Randy
     
  5. babyhuey

    babyhuey

    Sep 16, 2005
    AR
    My thoughts exactly.
    Thats why the power requirements of the PLX series scares me :rollno:
     
  6. Basically all your effects and whatnot pull approximately squat, they're all low power requirements, low or line level signal levels. They're driving electronic devices, don't require much power. They're not moving air and mechanical devices like the power amp. The only thing that effectively matters is your power amp. Look for the fuse or breaker on your power amp. Make sure the conditioner is over that with some headroom.

    If your amp says 10A @ 1/8 power, you can't assume that it wants 80A at full power. But I do think that probably rules out 15A conditioners. You risk popping the breaker under full power output of the amp.

    Just make sure you have a conditioner that will handle a bit more than the fuse rating on the power amp. Add a few extra amps to cover the other electronics in the rack.

    If you stuff multiple high power amps into one rack, and expect to push them hard, don't use the same power conditioner for sure, and try not to use the same circuit to power them both if at all possible. Don't plug the power amps into the same circuit with the lights either. Lights get seperate circuit if possible, no audio, helps with noise. Mixing lights with low power audio (mixer, sig processors) risks noise. Mixing lights and power amps on the same circuit risks noise and blowing breakers.

    Having a wireless helped me out on one gig, lights tripped the breakers if they were all on, I was able to go downstairs keep playing, hold a note or tap with left hand, flick the breaker back on quick with right hand without stopping. Luckily the panel was right under the stage, so I could hear bass/bass drum through the floor.

    Randy
     
  7. Finger Blister

    Finger Blister

    Jul 8, 2003
    Considering that the average Household
    outlet is on a 15 amp circuit...
     
  8. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    That's why 30A 220V breakout boxes are the minimum supply at properly wired venues. It also should make one question the value of conditioners for power amplifiers, when the big boys don't use them for just this reason.
     
  9. One time I was playing an outoor gig, long extention cord supplied by someone, way inadequate. Everything was running off one cord, essentially. Small streetcorner festival, so no monster pa or anything.

    Anyway, I run the furman ac regulator, it raises low voltages, drops high voltages, so you get a nice solid 120V nomatter what the supply voltage, within reason. I had never really seen it kick in before , maybe 104v ro so, nothing serious. But this gig, cause of the long extension cord that was obviously too thin to boot, when I cranked out a low B at high volume, I could see the input voltage just DIVE.... it was fascinating. I could drop the line voltage to around 88 volts.

    The bad news was I'm sure that in order to maintain the voltage at 120 for me while the line voltage dips to the low 90's/upper 80's, I had to pull extra current to get the same power. The extra current would just exaggerate the voltage drop on the power cord, so I was making the problem worse for everyone else on stage to keep myself nice and comfortable at 120V... :D TOUGH! That's why I paid extra for a REGULATOR instead of a CONDITIONER...

    Of course, you could argue that if I only needed it once in 20 years, maybe it was a waste of money.... :confused:

    What surprises me is how I've never seen a power problem since I got that in a bar, I always assumed they had really crappy power, maybe wiring too. But never had serious brownout until this one outdoor gig.

    Randy
     
  10. Eric Moesle

    Eric Moesle Supporting Member

    Sep 21, 2001
    Columbus OH
    FWIW, I have an ammeter on my Furman PM-8 that tells how much amperage I am drawing at a given moment during a set.
    ,
    I QSC PLX3002, Eden Navigator, and KorgRack tuner, as well as my pedalboard ALL TOGETHER only draws about 3 amps, sometimes flickers to 4 amp draw on my loud notes when driven hard . . . .

    My opinion, a 15 amp power conditioner will be fine for most people . . . .
     
  11. I believe it, most of the time you're not pulling nearly full output out of the power amp, especially the guys with the >1000W amps. I just don't like the idea of using a power condition that's guaranteed to cut out if my amp puts out its rated power.... :D
    Randy