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1962 Fender jazz bass wiring harness

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by hosebass, Mar 26, 2013.


  1. hosebass

    hosebass

    May 8, 2010
    Los Angeles
    I need some recommendations on purchasing a prefab wiring harness for a 1962 concentric pot Fender Jazz Bass. Any help would be appreciated!
     
  2. JoeWPgh

    JoeWPgh

    Dec 21, 2012
    There aren't any that I'm aware of that are exact replicas. That said, you should be able to get something fairly cheap from fleabay. To make it more accurate to the 62 specs you'll need to add resistors between the 2 tone pots to keep them independent.
     
  3. Grissle

    Grissle

    May 17, 2009
  4. hosebass

    hosebass

    May 8, 2010
    Los Angeles
    I have now seen two version of the wiring diagram 1) with .05 + .03 ceramic disc caps and then the version with the .05 +..03 caps and 220k resistors. I have also seen kits with .047 oil paper caps or .047 orange drops. Dazed and Confused....
     
  5. JoeWPgh

    JoeWPgh

    Dec 21, 2012
    .05 is the same as .047. Likewise, .03 is a .022. It's really sort of a 'salt to taste' thing. I don't think type of capacitor is going to make an audible difference.
     
  6. SGD Lutherie

    SGD Lutherie Banned Commercial User

    Aug 21, 2008
    Bloomfield, NJ
    Owner, SGD Music Products
    .05µF is pretty much the same as .047µF, but .022µF is not the same as .033µF. They will sound different.
     
  7. mystic38

    mystic38

    Dec 4, 2012
    Mystic CT
    I really doubt that in 1962 that 0.05uF caps were available...

    If it was me, I would go for 0.047uF paper foil as that sounds period to me.. 50 years on, i think some of that "vintage tone" is poor tolerance components, seeping gunge, increased internal resistance and leakage current... so mebbe give 0.033uF a shot too.
     
  8. hosebass

    hosebass

    May 8, 2010
    Los Angeles
    So Paper foil better than ceramic disc?
     
  9. mystic38

    mystic38

    Dec 4, 2012
    Mystic CT
    in 40yrs certainly :)

    lol, but seriously, I doubt that it would make much if any audible difference..they are cheap enough you can experiment.

     
  10. If the bass is an original '62, then why are you changing the wiring harness?

    If you don't mind me asking.

    Davo
     
  11. Stealth

    Stealth

    Feb 5, 2008
    Zagreb, Croatia
    It's a marketing ploy and it hasn't been proven to produce an audible difference. Use whichever capacitors you have at hand, ceramic or disc or "chiclet" or what have you. .047 uF and .05 uF are very close together and you're unlikely to hear the difference, so pick whichever is cheaper. .022 and .033 are very different, so try one, then the other.

    To get a '61 tone out of your Jazz, wire using the resistor-less schematic. Your tone controls will interact and you might get some deeper tones out of your bass with both tones rolled down, but you'll never have each tone control working on only one pickup and won't have as much versatility.
    To get a '62 tone out of your Jazz and much more tonal versatility, use the schematic with the resistors. You will have to bump the input gain on your amplifier a bit to make up for the output loss the resistors create, but the tone controls will act truly independently.
     
  12. hosebass

    hosebass

    May 8, 2010
    Los Angeles
    Just to clarify. i want to put this in a Jazz bass with SD antiquity pickups. i wish i had the original harness. But thanks to everyone for the info! I appreciate the input.
     
  13. hosebass

    hosebass

    May 8, 2010
    Los Angeles
    Stealth, thank you for you information. Your suggestion for adding the 220k resistors has interested me. ButI have i seen schematics that the value of the concentric pots change if you use the 220k resistors. Can you please clarify?
     
  14. Stealth

    Stealth

    Feb 5, 2008
    Zagreb, Croatia
    When it comes to pots, there are two rules to follow:
    1. You should use 250 kΩ-value pots if you want a more vintage bass sound with less treble, and 500 kΩ-value pots if you want a more modern sound with more treble.
    2. You should preferably have the volume pots with linear taper (marked as B250K or B500K), and the tones with audio/logarithmic taper (marked as A250K or A500K). This makes the volumes and tones sweep the most uniformly, from fully off to fully on, to most people's ears. You can ignore that if you wish and just try different tapers to see what fits your ears and hands most.
    The latter may be a problem if you're using two stacked pots, as it's not easy to find a pot with one deck linear and the other logarithmic, but you could always get one linear stacked pot and one logarithmic stacked pot, and use one for volumes and one for tones. I'm not sure what Fender used in the original (it could've been a pair of stacked A250Ks which is not optimal, but it works).

    Now, the isolating resistors you use have a triple effect - one is to provide tone control isolation, the other is to lower the output and the third is to slightly (and in most cases completely inaudibly) change the tone of the bass. However, that shouldn't affect your choice of pots at all.
    Instead, if you want to experiment with the isolation-versus-low output effect, get a handful of pairs of resistors, starting with 2× 75 kΩ and ending with 2× 220 kΩ and try each pair. The smaller the resistors the less they'll impact the sound, but the less they'll insulate the tone controls as well. I've heard guitarists using 94 kΩ resistors, and the Fender 62 Jazz uses the 220 kΩ ones.
     
  15. hosebass

    hosebass

    May 8, 2010
    Los Angeles
    Thank very much for the education! I really appreciate it.
     

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