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1x15 Out of Stock.....add another 4x10 instead?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by wannabe_bassist, Mar 23, 2003.


  1. 1x15 - wait for it to come in

    12 vote(s)
    57.1%
  2. 4x10 - add another to the one you have now.

    9 vote(s)
    42.9%
  1. wannabe_bassist

    wannabe_bassist Guest

    Jan 25, 2002
    Florida
    I have a Hartke HA-3000 amp with a VX series 4x10 cabinet.

    I can add another cabinet.....but which one?

    Should I add another 4x10 or the 1x15?

    I ordered a 1x15 at the local Samash, but they were out of stock and it has already been over a week. They have plenty of 4x10's in stock though.

    Should I just get another 4x10? Or does the 1x15 really add anything to the sound?
     
  2. wannabe_bassist

    wannabe_bassist Guest

    Jan 25, 2002
    Florida
    The 1x15 is only $249.

    The 4x10 is $299.

    Willing to pay the extra to get it now (have a jam session this coming weekend).

    This would effectively give me an 8x10. I remember reading on Glenn Letsch's website that the powers of 10 is what matters. He esposes the 10" over any other size speaker.

    I guess that is why the Ampeg 8x10 cabs are so popular with touring bands.

    Any opinions are helpful....
     
  3. I'd go for the 4x10's.
     
  4. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
    ...and I'd hold out for the 15.
     
  5. Mike A

    Mike A Supporting Member

    Oct 3, 2002
    Kentucky
    you can see by the posts above exactly how this thread will continue, if it continues. Some love 15's.. some hate 'em. (I love em.. but I have a 410 on top of it) Take your head & cab to the store & plug in!!! [Obie Wan voice]Only you can decide[Obie Wan voice]
     
  6. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL
    Hold out for the 15 buddy!
     
  7. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
    Word.
     
  8. 10 :bassist:
     
  9. Im a sock

    Im a sock

    Dec 23, 2002
    Central MA
    go for the 15. i'm currently in the process of adding a 1x15 to my rig though, so i might be a little biased :D .

    seriously though, if you're looking for a bit of a deeper addition to your sound, go with the 15, but if you want more punchiness and a tighter sound, go for the 10s.
     
  10. TxBass

    TxBass

    Jul 3, 2002
    Frisco, Texas
    hold out for the 15--assuming that's what you want based on your original post. can't lose either way, but it might give you more options on overall sound.
     
  11. Caca de Kick

    Caca de Kick Supporting Member

    Nov 18, 2002
    Seattle / Tacoma
    I'd say go with the 4x10's. The tight cluster of speakers is going to fill more/clearer sound at loud volumes.
    I've had both combinations in the past (in GK and Eden). To me in the rock music (Faith no More style) I play, two 4x10 cabs would be best.
     
  12. Schwinn

    Schwinn

    Dec 4, 2002
    Sarasota, FL
    Thus, his prophecy rings true.....
     
  13. Get 2 18"s
     
  14. xyllion

    xyllion Commercial User

    Jan 14, 2003
    San Jose, CA, USA
    Owner, Looperlative Audio Products
    As you can tell, everyone has their own preference on this. I use a 2x10 and 1x15. I like the combination. I think a 1x15 would be a good addition to your 4x10.
     
  15. Marley's Ghost

    Marley's Ghost Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 9, 2002
    Tampa, FL
    Dude, I think your amp is underpowered for the cabs.

    HA3000 = 180watts @ 8ohms to VX410 = 400 @8 ohms -OR-
    300 watts @ 4ohms to VX410 = 400 @8 ohms and VX115 300 watts @ 8ohms = Total 700 watts.

    Either way, watch for clipping :eek:
     
  16. xyllion

    xyllion Commercial User

    Jan 14, 2003
    San Jose, CA, USA
    Owner, Looperlative Audio Products
    This is a naive way of approaching the issue. You can't just look at the numbers like that and say that his rig is wrong. Your solution is only correct if he is pushing the speakers to their limits. Odds are he isn't. If he isn't hearing any distortion, then he isn't pushing his amp too far and he isn't damaging his cabs.

    Let's face it. Even though I have an 800W amp, I never drive my cabs to their limit. The thing to be concerned about is that your system is loud enough without distortion at the volume you need to acheive. Anything above that is overkill. Yea, it is nice to have the extra for peace of mind, but realistically you can get away with less.
     
  17. Johnny BoomBoom

    Johnny BoomBoom Supporting Member

    Jun 8, 2001
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Once upon a time I was in the same position - head, 4 x 10 and what to add! Well, mostly I play rock, heavy rock and a bit of metal - I added the 1 x 15 and never looked back. Just my 2 cents worth...
     
  18. Marley's Ghost

    Marley's Ghost Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 9, 2002
    Tampa, FL
    I would consider it generally accepted best practice to match the amp wattage as closely as possible to the speaker rating. When you underpower the cabs, you run a much greater risk of clipping if you push the gain up. If you never push the gain above 1 or 2, it will probably never happen. But why then would he want to add a second cab?
     
  19. xyllion

    xyllion Commercial User

    Jan 14, 2003
    San Jose, CA, USA
    Owner, Looperlative Audio Products
    Matching those numbers between your cab and your amp might give you a warm and fuzzy feeling, but will not protect you from damage. The amp rating is the maximum power it can put out while maintaining no greater than some minimum amount of distortion.

    If you push that "matched" amp past its rating then it will start to distort and you could possibly damage your speaker cabs. The rating is not the maximum that the amp will put out. In fact, since those ratings aren't derived in a consistent manner. There is no way of really knowing what your amp will do when you reach that rating point.

    I think adding a cab might be just the ticket. You can put 200W into a single cab and find it not loud enough, but if you put those same 200W into 2 cabs you may find to be just right. Splitting your 200W gives 100W into each. The difference between 100W and 200W in output volume from a single cab is not a significant change, but adding the additional drivers will be significant.

    If this isn't generally accepted practice, I'm sorry, but engineering wise, it is correct.