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2 questions

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Garrett Mireles, Aug 26, 2003.


  1. 1. I strummed the EADG strings on my bass, and my tuner said the note was 'G'. So then I strummed it GDAE and it still said 'G'. Do a combination of certain notes produce another note, or is my tuner just screwy? Personally, when I hear a chord, I just hear a bunch of notes instead of one, but I figured it wouldn't hurt to ask.

    2. What's the difference between a triad and a chord? Both have the 1,3,5 degrees so I'm a bit confused, as normal.

    Thanks. :bassist:
     
  2. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    1) The tuner can only tune one note so it's gonna pick up the loudest or present tone, which happens to be the G in this case.

    2)A triad and a chord can be the same thing. Mainly a triad will determine if a chord is major, minor, diminished or augmented. For example a 1-3-5 chord is a major triad and a major chord. 1-flat 3-5 is a minor triad and a minor chord. A G7 chord is a major triad with a dominant (flattened) 7th. A Gm7 is a minor triad with a dominant 7th. And so on.
     
  3. chardin

    chardin

    Sep 18, 2000
    I'm just guessing that your tuner may just be picking up the loudest note (string). Some tuners have a hard time with low bass notes. I doubt there is anything wrong with it. You could check it against an electronic keyboard if you're really concerned.

    At a minimum, a chord is three notes or a triad. However, a chord can have more than 3 notes. For example, Cmaj7 has C E G B. A Cm9 has 5 notes; C Eb G Bb and D. There was a huge debate a little while ago if two notes make up a chord. I call that a double stop.

    I hope this helps.
     
  4. Thanks, guys.

    So basicly, as far as BASS chords go, they follow the 1,3,5 rule because it's hard to play more than a 3 note chord on bass, right?

    As for the double stop, can't you imply chords by omitting the fifth if it's a perfect fifth, or is that just traids?
     
  5. chardin

    chardin

    Sep 18, 2000
    You can play 4 note chords on a 4 string bass if you want. They tend to sound muddy because the notes are fairly close together. You can use open strings in combination with higher notes to get around this. Of course, if you have a 5 or 6 (or more) string, you can go wild. There are lots of books on bass chords but I just experiment to find voicings that sound good to me.

    As far as chords go, the 3rd and 7th are the "color" notes that really define the chord. So, yes, playing the root and third will give everyone the right impression. As an intro to one song, I play the chord progression up around the 12th fret with just root and third double stops.

    My favorite double stop is to play the root on the E string and the 10th (3rd) on the G string. Really cool at the end of a song. Be sure to flat the third if it's a minor chord. Sliding up or down into a double stop is nice too.

    Edit: Typos.
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member


    You need to buy Michael Dimin's book - "The Chordal Approach"!! ;)

    You won't regret it!
     
  7. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    I think that's a slightly misleading description.

    A triad is a kind of chord. So a triad is *always* a chord, but a chord isn't necessarily a triad.

    A triad is a 3 note chord composed of two consecutive 3rds. There are four types of triad: major (maj 3rd + min 3rd), minor (min 3rd + maj 3rd), diminished (min 3rd + min 3rd), and augmented (maj 3rd + maj 3rd).

    A triad is a kind of chord, and yes, it is either major, minor, diminished or augmented.

    You wouldn't say that a minor 7 chord has a dominant 7th. "Dominant 7th" isn't the same as "flattened 7th". A minor 7 chord has a flattened 7th. A dominant 7th is a chord, which contains the major 3rd and the flattened 7th. So you wouldn't really say that a m7 chord has a dominant 7th. But you would say it has a minor 7th, or a flattened 7th.

    Sorry, I don't mean to rip on you, jive, I just think it's important to get it right here.
     
  8. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Actually, perfect 5ths in chords (whether they're triads or not) are not "necessary" in voicings. You can just play C and E, and it still counts as a C Major chord. It's not just implying a C Major chord, it *is* a C Major chord ;)

    It would tend to sound stronger with the 5th, though.
     
  9. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    No problem Moley. Sometimes others can write down my thoughts better than I, and input from others gives my thoughts more clarity.
     
  10. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    According to my Pocket Manual of Musical Terms:

    Chord 1. A harmony of two or more tones. :D

    The triads you mentioned above are formed by consecutive thirds, but Sus4 and Sus2 triads are not.
     
  11. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    I don't believe that sus2 and sus4 are considered triads, even if they are just 3 tones. Triads take the form 1 3 5.

    I believe this definition is used by Levine, as well as the folks over at musictheory.net.
     
  12. stuie86

    stuie86

    May 9, 2003
    mckinney, tx
    all i hace to say is wha?.... i hate not know about this stuff, i guess im still more of a singer even after two years:confused:

    im going to go look for a teacher now:spit:

    oh and about the tuner i say go get one desined(CS) for bass(that is if you have the money)
     
  13. Alright, where can I download it? :D

    I spent $30 on new strings today, so I have $0. I need a job..
     
  14. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    moley posted:


    The sixths sheiks sixths sheeps sick ;)

    :D
     
  15. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    How is that book Bruce? sounds like it might be a goodun?

    I should imagaine it's fairly comprehensive if Mr Dimin's posts are anything to go by! :D
     
  16. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    It's quite short actually - but a good introduction to playing chords for solo bass guitar.
     
  17. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    Aah I'll probably give it a miss then.
    Ta
    H