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2WD or 4WD Xterra or Pathfinder?

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by ShockBlueXterra, May 24, 2003.


  1. Xterra 4WD automatic

    1 vote(s)
    11.1%
  2. Pathfinder 4WD automatic

    5 vote(s)
    55.6%
  3. Xterra 4WD 5-speed

    2 vote(s)
    22.2%
  4. Pathfinder 4WD 5-speed

    4 vote(s)
    44.4%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. [​IMG]

    Which is your favorite? Nissan Pathfinder or Xterra?? You guys know mine! P.S. Pathfinder is coming out with a new kind of model..
     
  2. I like the new pathfinders.
    I was very dissapointed w/ the Xterras.
    95% of my SUV travels are road driving and the bouncy truck-like handling of the Xterra is made for off road stuff. I test drove an xterra for a day and found it diving into the corners. Terrible bounciness, and the stiff ladder frame did nothing but jar me around. I even had to take the supercharged version out becuz the non SC Xterra was slower than molasses. I have to say the look of the xterra is inviting and the off-roadin abilities are prolly superior to many SUV's but i don't use any of those abilities. So a pathfinder for me
    frank
     
  3. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    I have a 2000 Xterra 5spd. I really enjoy it but I do drive off-road and I have really appreciated (and regularly take advantage of) the mammoth cargo space (65 cubic feet). Yes, it does drive very much like a truck due to body on frame construction. Although the ride has been smoother since I got better tires than the originals that came on it.

    So I guess it comes down to what you want and what your priorities are. Test drive them both and see what you like. That's assuming you can afford either. The Pathfinder costs more. 4wd and automatic add to the cost as well. That's why I went 5 spd. The Pathfinder has more luxury options as the Xterra was originally meant to be more of a spartan, back to basics SUV. However I noticed that the number of luxury options was greatly increased on the 2003 model.

    brad cook
     
  4. Tsal

    Tsal

    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    My vote goes to.. smaller cabs, instead.
     
  5. Jeep Cherokee.

    Next question.

    ;) :smug:
     
  6. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Hmm...so that helps off-road ability? Ok! I'll have to try it out! ;)

    brad cook
     
  7. Beefbass

    Beefbass Guest

    Feb 4, 2001
    Having worked for 9 and a half years for Nissan dealerships, IMHO the Pathfinder is a better choice. I found the Xterra too confining.
    The Xterra is not a bad vehicle mind you. But if you are a large sized person, you'll like the Pathfinder better IMHO.
     
  8. Tsal

    Tsal

    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    Well yes, with 100 lbs less in your trunk, your car rides a bit higher :D

    Seriously, most SUVs see pretty much only asphalt and occasional gravel roads. Unless you consider actually going off-road, I'd pick some smaller, less expensive & more enviromentally friendly ride.
     
  9. I'm surprised that a resident of one of the world's snowiest countries would say this, but maybe y'all have more efficient road-clearing services than we do. Granted, 60-75% of the US population lives in an area where it either doesn't snow or there's sufficient population to pay for rapid road-clearing, but for the rest of us four-wheel drive comes in handy at least a dozen times every winter.

    Or, you could just get a Subaru like everyone here in Ithaca.
     
  10. Brendan

    Brendan

    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    It scares me that a Sports Utility Vehicle is even available in 2WD. Seems to me to defeat the purpose, y'know?
     
  11. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Or have 350 acres of family land that is roamed regularly in which the thought of a sedan trying to traverse it is laughable (Actually this year my cousin and friends got 2 4wd pickups, a gigantic tractor and a bulldozer all stuck on the same day during a particularly rainy stint - that's not really the norm though).

    brad cook
     
  12. Well, back when my family lived in Colorado, we had an '86 Mitsubishi Montero 2-door (our old Volvo DL couldn't get up hills in the snow, which is a fairly common task in the Denver area). At the time, Mitsubishi sold a whole lot of 2WD Monteros, because the 4WD system standard until '86 required the driver to get out of the car and flip a lever underneath the chassis to engage 4WD. '86 was the first year they offered selectable part-time 4WD with electronic switching.

    So I guess, back in the day, if you were looking for an enclosed, air-conditioned truck--which is basically what, say, a Suburban is--4WD wasn't necessarily that big of a deal. Now that electronic switching is the standard, there's no reason to buy a 2WD SUV; the weight savings is too small to have much of an impact on fuel economy, and you lose a lot of utility.
     
  13. Tsal

    Tsal

    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    Probably that is the case - hey, if you are bound to have snow on the road for five months a year, you are bound to have good road service too! - and of course high car- and fuel taxation has it's effect, but a smaller 2WD is still what an average Scandinavian drives. I do see couple bad snow days each winter, but usually the main roads are cleaned up pretty fast.

    But anyways, if you have a good reason to have one, I won't be against that. I just hate it when people buy huge gas guzzlers they don't actually need.
     
  14. Actually, "huge" doesn't have to equal "gas guzzler"; the engines used in SUVs and trucks are often shockingly primitive and inefficient compared to those in sedans, and streamlining is basically non-existent. This owes more to regulatory loopholes than anything else--the carmakers are acting perfectly reasonably in keeping costs low on SUVs by substituting older systems. (The standard GM truck V8, for example, is a 40-year-old design that has only undergone modest tweaks through the years.)
     
  15. Mike N

    Mike N Missing the old TB

    Jan 28, 2001
    New York
    I'll agree with the "no reason to buy a 2wd SUV", but most of your modern 4WD trucks(including your Jeep Cherokee) have the front axleshafts(and often time the front driveshaft) spinning all the time, which causes needless drag, wear and tear, and loss of economy. Theres something to be said for the "old school" locking hub/lever activated 4x4 setups that didnt spin things needlessly.

    And, imo I'll pass on the electric 4x4 systems. Seen too many problems that can cost way too much to fix. Give me a lever and lockouts anyday.
     
  16. Mike N

    Mike N Missing the old TB

    Jan 28, 2001
    New York
    That V8(the Smallbock) is only available in the G series van. The Pickup/Suburban V8 is the SB2, which was new in the late 90's, and it shares nothing with the old Smallblock(which dates to 1955.)
     
  17. Yogi Bear

    Yogi Bear Supporting Member

    Aug 14, 2000
    Colorado
    Amen to that... In the newer trucks that I have owned I have always swithched to the the old standby of Warn hubs up front and ditching the whole electronic transfer case activation.

    As the owner if a 99 Cherokee I'm glad that mine does not have the NP242 transfer case which allows the driver to have 4WD engaged at all times. The NP231 which I have has that lever for switching to 4WD whihc I believe is vacuum engaged.
     
  18. Mike N

    Mike N Missing the old TB

    Jan 28, 2001
    New York
    You should have a vacuum pod on the passenger side axle tube that couples the shaft together when 4x4 is selected. The only thing is the axleshafts and spider gears turn all the time, whether in 2 or 4wd. Youre needlessly beating the axlejoints up, and since Chrysler wasnt kind enough to put grease fittings in them, they have a fairly high failure rate (especially in an area where road salt use is common).

    With car makers struggling to get corporate average fuel economy up, its amazing they would design something that would spin all the time and create more drag, thereby hurting fuel economy.
     
  19. Yogi Bear

    Yogi Bear Supporting Member

    Aug 14, 2000
    Colorado
    Wow, I did'nt know that about the Jeep products. That really is surprising, because they tout the Jeeps with the NP231 as having a true part time 4WD system. Is this true for most of the new 4WD drives on the market today?


    Oh, and to stay on topic... I prefer the Xterra over the Pathfinder. :D