2year old time for a new set?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by cobrasneverdie, Jul 12, 2003.

  1. ive had my strings for about 2 years (the whole life of my bass) is it about time for a new pair?
  2. Only if you dont like your current sound. I would personally leave them on until they break, but many people get a new set every 2 weeks. It's all about your preference.
  3. ok thanks :D
  4. Trevorus


    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    hey, cobras, ever been down to champaign? You ought to come visit me at the music store where I work!
  5. You might want to change, but for a different reason. I have a Labella M45 set that got absolutely perfect at 2 years, so I changed strings and put that set away for some time when I absolutely have to have a perfect set.
  6. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Word. I changed the four-year-old strings on my Lakland (only because I thought four years was a long time), and hated the sound of the new strings (too bright). It's taken me about six months to get them where they sound decent to my ear again.
  7. I always like to have a broken-in set for spares which means living with new strings more than is fun.
  8. To those of you who don't like bright/new strings, why don't you use flatwounds?
  9. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    You can get used to old strings, but 2 years is a time that may be too long (breaking).
    Also, the sound of new strings might be a pleasant surprise to you. Cheaper basses don't tolerate old strings as well as better ones IME.
  10. bollefen


    Mar 13, 2003
    hmmm when i built guitars i did a bit of research into this and one thing that i found was that as the metal fatigued it took more tension to maintain the same vibration frequency.

    i can't recall how much the increase was but it was not insignificant i'm thinking 25-30% increase.


    the extra tension could have an effect on the neck.

    personally i use TIs primarily for the low tension on the long bass neck.

    i'd also note that on some of the acoustics i built i used high tesion to get the sound out of the box that i was looking for. while "fragile" guitars for very low tension strings e.g. froggy bottom, they are typically small sweet voiced parlor instruments.


  11. Yes.:D

    Don't you find the intonation changes over time, or do you clean the strings with isopropyl alcohol regularly?
  12. wulf


    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    A two string bass? Or do you mean a new set?

    I know it's picky... but you want to use the right terms to make sure you buy the right thing.

    BTW, if you like the sound of the strings and they stay in tune well and are properly intonated, there's no need to change them... but a spare set wouldn't go amiss.

  13. bikeplate

    bikeplate Supporting Member

    Jun 7, 2001
    Upstate NY

    I change strings at least once a month, if not more. Two years, no way! I have 4 basses I regularly gig with, too. I can't stand dead strings. No zing, dead, don't stay in tune that well.

  14. Agreed. I love the sound of a new set of strings, and I like my strings to be as zingy as possible. I usually change mine about once every 1-2 months, when my current strings start sounding dead, although I recently discovered the wonders of cleaning strings with WD-40, which does help return the zing to a dying set of strings. Then again, I get really sweaty hands when I play, so I have to clean my strings nearly every two weeks just to keep them sounding good.
  15. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    I love the sound of old flatwounds. I used to be a zing freak, but have definitely gone over to the "dark side". As long as the strings still have decent intonation, I leave them on. I have tapewounds that have been on for a couple of years.

    It is all a matter of finding YOUR sound. Maybe old strings will express what is in your head, or maybe you will need zingy strings to express yourself. My voice comes now comes through with TI flats on a semi-hollow fretless.