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3 Wood Challenge Particle board P!

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by SamanthaCay, Jun 3, 2012.


  1. SamanthaCay

    SamanthaCay Like bass guitar OMG!

    Nov 16, 2008
    Denver, CO.
    Alright folks here's my build thread, this is going to be a maple necked particle board bodied p bass.

    You'll have to bare with me as this is going to most likely be painstakingly slow due to the experimental nature of it and as well due to the fact that I still have quite a few things to get for this one and my budget is tight.

    I got to looking through my parts and didn't have quite as much as I had thought but with four months to get it done I don't foresee a problem, worse case scenario I'll just end up robbing some parts from one of my other basses.

    Here's what I have gotten done so far.

    The neck is from an old lotus bass.
    I got started on this a while back by reshaping the headstock although it is still pretty rough and will require a bit more sanding to get it right.

    When I got this thing it had the frets pulled, the truss rod nut was completely ceased to the rod and someone had tried removing it with vice grips or something of the like so it was pretty mangled up and there was a crack running around where the nut is.

    I tried everything I could to get that nut off to no avail so what I ended up doing was chipping off the piece of cracked wood in order to get to the whole nut and then sawing it off with a dremel.
    Then with the old nut off I glued the chip back in place and got a new nut for it.

    With that out of the way it is time to get it leveled and re-fretted but before that I had to drop some wood glue in all the fret slots, this way after I've leveled the board I can re-slot it and the new frets will go in and stick as though they where being put in fresh slots.

    That's where I'm at right now fingers crossed and moving on.
    lalala018.jpg
     
  2. SamanthaCay

    SamanthaCay Like bass guitar OMG!

    Nov 16, 2008
    Denver, CO.
    Fyi here's a sample of the particle board I'll be using.
    lalala019.jpg
    lalala020.jpg
    As well I have a question for you all.
    Since the headstock face is quite messed up I'm planning on either;

    A: Covering it with particle board veneer
    B: Painting it red to somewhat match the pickguard
    C: Painting it black

    Your thoughts?
     
  3. CBRXJ

    CBRXJ

    Jul 31, 2010
    Apple Valley Ca.
    That looks more like OSB (Oriented strand board). Your going to need a lot of filler.
     
  4. SamanthaCay

    SamanthaCay Like bass guitar OMG!

    Nov 16, 2008
    Denver, CO.
    OSB it is then.:D
    The plan for filling is to finish the whole body in epoxy. Although I'm not sure exactly what type yet it will most likely be what ever is cheap.;)
     
  5. klaus486

    klaus486

    Jun 27, 2009
    portland or
    sales geek Portland Music co.
    I think that however this turns out the bass should be painted the color of that blue mat you're working on. Look how it makes that tort pickguard POP!
     
  6. Rad. Subbed. I don't think you should hide the material, even- let it be what it is!
     
  7. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    I'm thinking maybe an epoxy finish to fill that wafer board may be your best bet. Have fun with it.
     
  8. SamanthaCay

    SamanthaCay Like bass guitar OMG!

    Nov 16, 2008
    Denver, CO.
    Yeah, sorry to not feed the gas for a blue bass but the whole point of using OSB is because it will look cool as heck under a high gloss clear epoxy finish.

    Well that, and that it may just be the best tone wood ever!:D
     
  9. Interesting! Sub a dub dub
     
  10. Progtologist

    Progtologist

    Jul 30, 2011
    Should be a very stable wood choice due to the random grain direction. Fairly dense as well from being resin bound under pressure and heat. If you can get a sealed and smooth finish that shows the underlying pattern it will look pretty awesome. Very interesting idea and I look forward to seeing how it turns out.
     
  11. gitlvr

    gitlvr

    Nov 13, 2009
    No. Va., USA
    Cool! On the headstock, I vote black!
     
  12. miziomix

    miziomix Über on my mind Commercial User

    Sep 28, 2009
    Milan, Kuala Lumpur, Paris.
    Bass builder @ MüB.
    Cool! :D

    Is the headstock that badly damaged to need a paint? To me natural would be best if you finish the body with epoxy.
     
  13. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Maybe somehow figure out a way to use the wafer board as a veneer. That would look pretty cool I think.
     
  14. iJazz

    iJazz

    Jan 9, 2012
    Sussex, WI
    OSB - The little tone wood that could. I'm lovin' it already!

    iJazz - SamanthaCay's DownMarket BoutiqueBass Fan
     
  15. Smilodon

    Smilodon Supporting Member

    Feb 18, 2012
    Norway
    My first thought when I saw the thread title was "This won't end well!"

    Now I want to try this myself. ;)


    Epoxy covered OSB could be a very cool look if done right. Just be careful when attaching the neck and bridge. I Would definitely go with a neck plate, not ferrules. OSB is pretty stable and strong, but usually it doesn't like screws very much. The small air pockets inside the wood could cause the wood chips to give way leaving the screw threads with nothing to hold on to.
    (Edit: If you are doing the body in two layers you could route out cavities below the bridge and put in some hardwood blocks to make sure the screws have proper grip)


    Oh, and I vote for a OSB veneer as a headstock.
     
  16. miziomix

    miziomix Über on my mind Commercial User

    Sep 28, 2009
    Milan, Kuala Lumpur, Paris.
    Bass builder @ MüB.
    Now THAT's a cool idea :D
     
  17. RaniBrandt

    RaniBrandt Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2011
    Suffolk County, NY
    Also, since your neck is all maple (at least it appears to be), you have only used two woods so far, so any kind of wood would still be fair game as a reinforcement block. You might even consider a full-body-length block to hold the neck and bridge, and use the chipboard as wings, or wings and a top veneer.

    Very cool idea, BTW!
     
  18. f64

    f64 Supporting Member

    Oct 31, 2009
    Naples, FL
  19. SamanthaCay

    SamanthaCay Like bass guitar OMG!

    Nov 16, 2008
    Denver, CO.
    First off thank you all for the wonderful comments and suggestions.
    The one about putting some reinforcement under the bridge is by far the best so far.
    I hadn't thought of that but now that I think of it I'll definitely be doing this for both the bridge and as well the pickup screws.

    Anyways on with the show.
    Last night I got the neck mounted to my bench and began with leveling it.
    The neck had too much relief so I sanded enough to get the old finish off and then marked it with pencil, this way I could carefully sand in only the areas I wanted to in order to get it fairly level.
    lalala021.jpg
    lalala022.jpg
    Once I had it where I wanted it I wiped the dust away from the sides of the neck and masked it off.
    Then I filled all the major chip out with Ca, pulled the tape and gave it a final level going through the grits up to 220.
    lalala025.jpg
    with that out of the way I re-cut all of the fret slots using my slotting saw with a stop attached to the side.
    lalala027.jpg
    That's all for now, I've got to clean my shop today but will most likely return to work on that OSB headstock veneer next.
     
  20. Looks like OSB,screws tend to not hold well in it as Smilodon said but as long as you're aware of it,I'm sure you can design a way to keep things solid.
     

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