Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

350W enough to power a 4-10 and a 1-15 cab?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by rayzak, Mar 21, 2001.


  1. rayzak

    rayzak

    Jan 13, 2001
    Louisville, KY
    Or would I be better off with a 2-10 and a 1-15, or maybe just a 4-10. Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    You can drive a 1x15" and a 4x10" with 50 watts if you want. So in other words, yes, 350W will drive your cabs. And the more speakers you have, the more sound you will get out of those 350 watts.
    Just watch the impedance!
     
  3. captainpabst

    captainpabst

    Mar 18, 2001
    Tennessee
    i would suggest buying as much power as you can afford. but 350 watts is plenty to drive a full stack...it just depends on how loud you want to play. less power + more speakers = less clarity when you crank it. more power is always good, but not always necessary. depends on how big your venue is, whether there will be a PA or not, what style you play, etc. i'd definitely go for 350 'quality' watts vs. equal or more 'cheap' watts. swr, ampeg, eden, ashdown, etc. would be quality watts. cheap watts, to me, include peavy, kustom, crate, etc.

    also consider impedence ratings...if that 350 watts is delivered at 4 ohms, and you run an 8 ohm cab, you'll get less than 350 peak watts. however, run a couple 4 ohm cabs full range, and you've got more than 350 watts...heheheh. i think 2x10 and a 15 is a good match for 350W...but i'd probably prefer the sound of a 4x10
     
  4. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    Doesn't this depend on the power ratings of the speakers too?
     
  5. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    AL/GA
    In my opinion (based on almost 25 yrs of gigging), 350 watts isn't even enough for a lone 4x10 or 1x15 if you want proper headroom. This is important, especially if you play very dynamically...too little power will clip your amp and send all kinds of nasties through those speakers...and they won't like it. 350 watts is barely enough for a good quality 2x10 and even that's questionable with some of the less-efficient designs like Acme and Epifani. But, as has been said by other posters: yes, you can drive that stack with 350 watts. The question is, what level of quality do you want? I'd get some more power. But that's just me.
     
  6. DaveB

    DaveB

    Mar 29, 2000
    Toronto Ontario
    I'm with mchildree on this. In my guitar life I played a bunch of pretty high energy Chicago/Texas blues gigs( mostly in medium size rooms) with a bass player who had an Eden WT-300 with 410 and 115 Warwick cabs.He regularly drove his rig into serious clipping. I was very surprised. In my bass life I play in a similar volume band and I've got an Eden WT-500 and a 410xlt.The combination of 200 extra watts and only one cab ( I use it bridged by the way) is light years better. I never drive my rig into clipping under exactly the same kind of room as the other guys rig.
    So yeah, 350 will drive a stack....but only to a certain volume.
     
  7. I agree with the other posts for the most part. You can never have too much power. But 350 will drive 2 cabinets no sweat. just adding the second cab will add headroom not to mention the extra power you'll get out of the amp. But go bigger if you can. Unless you're talking tube amps. Different ballgame. My 300 watt Ampeg SVT has lots of power. In fact I'd put it up against ANY solid state amp for overall volume.
     
  8. rayzak

    rayzak

    Jan 13, 2001
    Louisville, KY
    Hey guys, thanks for the input. One more thing worth mentioning: the band I am playing with owns their own PA. I think it's a pretty good one to, but not sure. I barely know anything about amps, let alone PA's. So if I go into a PA would 350 be enough or would you guys still suggest more wattage? Thanks again.
     
  9. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    AL/GA
    That would depend on how loud the stage volume will be, how much bass you want in that mix, and the level of capability of the monitor system. F'rinstance: you choose to stay with a small, low-volume rig and let the PA project all your bass to the house. That's great...very much preferred, even (provided you have a strong PA that'll get some low-end going). But what about hearing yourself onstage? If you have good monitors that'll handle it, you could boost yourself there to make up for your amp's low output. This is fine, but it can create a problem for others in the band who might not want to hear your bass so much onstage. Of course, if you can get seperate monitor mixes, that's a moot point. Also consider what happens if the monitors suck at any particular time (this happens very often), and you can't hear your bass because you're relying on them to hear yourself. You'll end up playing way too hard and hurting yourself so that you can't play well again for a week or so. Not good!

    On the other hand, if you just get a strong enough amp that can deliver at any volume, you can adjust it so that you hear it as needed while being able to adjust it so the others get as much of your bass as they want to hear.
     
  10. phil_chew

    phil_chew

    Mar 22, 2000
    Asia
    I have an Eden WT-300 head which I use to drive a 1x15 and a 4x10 cab. The first cab is 4 ohm (200W) and the second cab is 4 ohm (400W). I play in a hall which can sit about 600 people comfortably. Yet, I find myself having lots of headroom on my amp, i.e. rarely above 10 o'clock on master volume, and about 1 o'clock gain.

    So, no worries, you'll be pretty loud. If you cannot hear yourself with a 350W amp plus 2 cabs, it just means your guitarist and/or drummer is playing way too loud. Tell them to tone down for the sake of your ears.
     
  11. phil_chew

    phil_chew

    Mar 22, 2000
    Asia
    Sorry, I meant to say that both my cabs have 8 ohms impedance.
     
  12. DaveB

    DaveB

    Mar 29, 2000
    Toronto Ontario
    Phil brings up an interesting point about getting the other guys to turn down. I have had the reverse of that.A couple of years ago (in my guitar life)I played with a bass player who had an underpowered Peavey rig - good sounding just too little power. He was forever trying to get everybody to turn down ostensibly because of ear damage.The REAL reason was that his rig couldn't keep up- so his solution was for everybody else to turn down.
     
  13. With everything going through the system, the less stage volume the better. Keeping the amps from bleeding into the mics does wonders for the mix (just ask your sound man). First set the band up tight, just as physically close as possible. Have everyone angle their speakers so everyone can hear them. This helps cut down on instrument levels in the monitors and anyway the intelligibility is much greater with sounds coming from differently-placed sources instead of coming out of your monitor all mixed together. When everything's right, you can carry on a conversation without shouting while playing.
     
  14. I use a Hartke 3500 thru Hartke 115 & 410XL cabs, and have no problem keeping up with two guitarists (lead uses a Johnson Millenium). So yes, it can be done and without square wave distortion.
     
  15. Akebono

    Akebono

    Mar 23, 2001
    It is for me...most of the time. I use a SWR 350 head to drive an Eden 210-XLT and Peavey 115-BXBW stack. Both are cabs are 4 ohm, yielding a 2 ohm load. (So I think the actual load is something like 450 watts now that I think about it.)

    There are times when I wish I had more headroom, though. I usually address this by having the two guitarists turn down and giving the drummer his Ritalin. :)
     
  16. captainpabst

    captainpabst

    Mar 18, 2001
    Tennessee
    previously:

    less power + more speakers = less clarity when you crank it.

    Doesn't this depend on the power ratings of the speakers too?

    remember speakers themselves don't have 'power'...
    as long as what your speaker rig can handle (speaker power rating) isn't grossly mismatched to your head's output (ex. - 1000W into 1 10"), i think you're ok. i was just saying that trying to drive too many speakers with not enuf power inevitably causes the amp to run out of headroom and clip. then you've got distortion because of the amp clipping, not because the speakers can't take playing at high volumes. that's what i meant by no clarity.