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4 mics for ~200€

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by pm2lp, Mar 8, 2013.


  1. pm2lp

    pm2lp

    Aug 13, 2011
    Portugal
    I want to record some decent demos with my band so I'm looking for microphones to get the job done, I already have a good interface with 4 direct inputs and I intend to use them all, at least with the drum kit. (I will record each instrument individually)

    My plan is to get some clones/cheap mics from thomann or musicstore but I'm not sure which combination works the best, since I need to use some mics as "multi-purpose". The kick drum mic (probabily a cheap d112 clone from fame or t.bone) is a must so I will not include it as optional.

    Two options for the other 3 mics:

    - sm58 (vocals, guitar, snare) + 2 cheap small condenser mics (drum OH)
    - sm57 clone (guitar, snare) + cheap large condenser mic (vocals, drum OH R) + cheap small condenser mic (drum OH L)

    Which of this combinations will give me the best results, or there's any other better option, within my budget?
     
  2. audioglenn

    audioglenn

    Jul 14, 2012
    Pennsylvania
    This is a little hard to answer since you have not really specified your budget. So, I'll answer the questions you have proposed. Both the SM58 and SM57 will work well for vocals, guitar amps, and drums, and using a pair of small diaphragm condenser mics will be great for the drum overheads.
    You should know that the SM58 and Sm57 are very similar sounding mics. They both have the same pickup pattern(cardioid). The main difference between them is the fact that the SM58 has a windscreen(the ball) and the SM57 does not. For that reason, I would use the SM58 when you are ready to record the vocals.

    Let me just say that you are at the beginning of a very interesting learning curve. That is NOT meant to discourage you. Feel free to contact me if you have any further questions.
     
  3. Ender_rpm

    Ender_rpm

    Apr 18, 2004
    St. Louis MO
    The Golden Age FC4 gets good reviews as a small diameter OH, and is cheaper in europe than the US. A pair runs about $120 here (non-matched). Just add a 57 on snare and your bass mic and you;re good to go.
     
  4. pm2lp

    pm2lp

    Aug 13, 2011
    Portugal
    Thanks, I didnt know that. So, that means I can record vocals with a 57, if I add a pop filter, and have similar results to the 58? or its better to buy a 58 and remove the windscreen for snare and guitar amp?

    Btw, my budget is 200€ (260$). I can get a 58, bass mic and two small condenser mics for that price. ;)
     
  5. audioglenn

    audioglenn

    Jul 14, 2012
    Pennsylvania
    You don't have to buy a pop filter for the 57 or take the pop filter off the 58 for drums or guitar. I would use the 57 on the snare and guitar amp and use the 58 for vocals. They sound very similar and they both have the same pickup pattern which is cardioid(meaning they pick up sound from the front of the mic and reject sound from the rear).

    You may want to do a google search on "microphone pickup patterns".

    Good luck with your recording and don't get discouraged. There are some books you may want to get to learn some of the basics and some microphone manufacturers have general application literature that can be a big help, too. Check with Shure and AKG. Some may even have this info posted on their websites.
     
  6. If the goal is to record some decent demos... how about buying good utility mics that you'll keep (ie SM58, or SM57) for future use, and then renting some good condensers for the weekend? Why buy 'cheap condensers' that you won't want to keep in the future?
     
  7. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    Look for a pair of used, decent medium diaphragm condensers. Rode nt3, AKG C1000, etc. i picked up a pair of The Rode mic's here in the GFS at about $250 USD. Put something dedicated on the rear of the kick. Doesn't need to be great though an Audix D6 would be cherry. A key

    Look up 3 mic drum recording techniques on the interweb... 1 OHD, 1 out front , 1 next to the beater seems to work real well. The OHD and out front mic's need to be equi-distant from the center of the snare. The OHD positioned well above but directly over the snare center is a real good place to start.

    Note: those MDC's should match, you can mix 'n match but it will take some time to figure out the exact placement of the two mics. Using matching MDC's will make your life easier and the learning curve that much shorter.

    The MDC's will do a nice job for your guitar and vocals too. You'll need a pop filter for vocals regardless.

    SM57 and 58 are bottom feeders these days. Popular out of force of habit, there are so many better choices available, particularly for recording. I swear folks keep buying those mic's as they are too lazy or too uninformed to audition the alternatives. It's been a long, long time since Rodger Daltry and Robert Plant were swinging those mics around on stage... Most everything else has gotten better since the 60's .... Why not mic's ? Oh, wait they have...
     
  8. pm2lp

    pm2lp

    Aug 13, 2011
    Portugal
    Well, that's definitely different from what I had in mind.. I'll look for used mics to see if I can find something good. The thing is, without a dedicated mic on the snare I might have some problems mixing the drums, no? I need to study my options, but I'm enjoying your tips, many thanks to all. ;)
     
  9. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    No, look up techniques for mic'ing drums with three mics. I am making the assumption, maybe erroneously that you want the kit to sound like live acoustic drums. If you are looking for the monster kit, in your face, metal thing - you really can't do that anywhere near your budget... That takes a mic on every drum, a lot of channels, tuning and time... Drums that sound like a good acoustic kit -3 mic's, tuning and time...
     
  10. pm2lp

    pm2lp

    Aug 13, 2011
    Portugal
    No, I just want the drums to sound acceptable but I do need a strong snare, it's garage rock btw. I'll look up techniques for mic'ing drums with 3 mics.
     
  11. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    See if you can locate the Tape Op article. It's a classic on the subject.

    The drummer is more than half responsible for that. He'll be listening through phones I hope and so of the snare needs more oomph... He needs to deliver that... Tuning the kit is a very, very important part of the process.
     

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