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400hz, 600hz, or 800hz for aggresive growl?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Ryan OD, Apr 1, 2004.


  1. 400hz

    28 vote(s)
    42.4%
  2. 600hz

    13 vote(s)
    19.7%
  3. 800hz

    17 vote(s)
    25.8%
  4. Other (please post your choice in thread)

    8 vote(s)
    12.1%
  1. Ryan OD

    Ryan OD

    Nov 3, 2003
    Northern VA
    On one of my basses, I'm trying to get the most aggressive growl I can. Should I hardwire my mids for 400hz, 600hz, 800hz, or something different?

    I don't want to install a frequency selector switch. Since I'm only looking for one sound out of this bass, I won't need to tweak it once I find it.
     
  2. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    600 Hz.
     
  3. Ryan OD

    Ryan OD

    Nov 3, 2003
    Northern VA
    Holy crap, you're fast! :D
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    Thanks. I had a bass with the SD 3 band basslines preamp. The mid band was centered on 675 Hz. The midboost was so annoying and harsh that I sold it. If you want aggressive, it might be what you're after.
     
  5. mark beem

    mark beem Gold Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2001
    New Hope, Alabama
    Why not leave your bass alone and get an outboard EQ?
     
  6. Ryan OD

    Ryan OD

    Nov 3, 2003
    Northern VA
    ProgZilla,

    I already have an on-board pre-amp. The mids come pre-wired at 800hz. I'm assuming I'll get closer to the sound I'm looking for with a lower setting. Just looking for others opinions before I start rewiring.

    Plus, I prefer to have more control on the bass rather than on extra equipment.
     
  7. Fuzzbass

    Fuzzbass P5 with overdrive Supporting Member

    IMO, the answer depends on the mids that are most prominent in the bass itself ... perhaps the speaker cabinet(s) too.
     
  8. mark beem

    mark beem Gold Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2001
    New Hope, Alabama
    Hmmm.. would seem if you "hard wire" the bass at a certain frequency you have less control... Limiting tonal options.. :meh:
     
  9. Ryan OD

    Ryan OD

    Nov 3, 2003
    Northern VA
    Good point. I'm sure I'll end up wiring it over and over until I find the way that sounds best with my band. Just trying to get some insight as to where I should start. The sooner I nail the tone I'm after, the less wiring & soldering I'll have to do!

    If it helps, I'm playing through a Mesa M-Pulse 600 head, and Mesa Road Ready 2x10 and 1x15 cabs. The bass itself is made out of Bubinga with a Wenge neck and fingerboard.

    Thanks to everyone for the help.
     
  10. Ryan OD

    Ryan OD

    Nov 3, 2003
    Northern VA
    You're right, but as I said before I don't need tonal options with this specific bass. Since I'm only looking for one sound out of it, I won't need anything more than maybe a minor tweak with changing environments.
     
  11. knuckle_head

    knuckle_head Commercial User

    Jul 30, 2002
    Seattle
    Owner; Knuckle Guitar Works & Circle K Strings
    There's a well-thought-of mastering guy in LA that suggests 800 Hz - think Tool
     
  12. RAM

    RAM

    May 10, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    IME, low mids are great for a growly tone, where hi mids are great for more of a "honky" tone. I'd center the frequency at 400.

    Of course, it also depends on the bass. A bright-sounding bass made with lots of maple or swamp ash, you might want to cut the low mids a touch because it's not a natural resonant frequency for those woods. My Spector sounds great when I boost the mids in the 400-500 frequency, and it's all maple. My Jerzy Drozd is walnut with a wenge neck (and other woods too) and sounds better when I center the mids around 250.
     
  13. David Wilson

    David Wilson Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Lower Westchester, NY
    I prefer to boost the low mids round 400hz-500hz for cutting through, and cut them in the 700-800 range for slap.

    I like that the Bongo's have both low and high mid eq controls.
     
  14. bassjigga

    bassjigga

    Aug 6, 2003
    I'd also suggest 400hz. Like was stated, you want to boost low mids for growl. Zon's "Special" is specifically designed for this and the midrange freq. is 330hz.
     
  15. Tim__x

    Tim__x

    Aug 13, 2002
    Alberta, Canada
    Why don't you install a small switch inside the electronics cavity? That way you can experiment for the first few days and then never have to worry bumping it out of place.
     
  16. Halftooth

    Halftooth Supporting Member

    Nov 24, 2002
    Tri-Valley, NorCal
    I like playing with a variety of mid frequency settings. The more the better. I like a 250 boost for a fuller sound. I like 400-500 for cutting. I like 800 for a slight upper mid boost, and I tend to roll of 1050 for a scooped sound. my recomendation would be to wire some kind of switch that will allow you to adjust your setting.
     
  17. knuckle_head

    knuckle_head Commercial User

    Jul 30, 2002
    Seattle
    Owner; Knuckle Guitar Works & Circle K Strings
    You can always install a couple (few?) EMG VMCs... boost and cut forever...... frequencies of your choosing.
     
  18. Joe Smithberger

    Joe Smithberger Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2002
    Canton, Ohio, USA
    I will chime in with 400 also. My Fishman Pro EQ DI has three bands for mids. I find that 200 Hz is Boomy with my gear, 800 Hz adds to the finger noise, and 400 Hz is just right. I play a Fender jazz 4 and a Stingray 5. 400 Hz accentuates the growl and helps cut.
     
  19. dTune

    dTune

    Feb 28, 2004
    Finland
    Voted 400Hz, but I think the best way is to boost around 300-500Hz, it depends a lot on the other instruments and space.

    Don't know if it's hallucination but i think some basses have an awful sound in that area.. Quite irrational, thinking that a 314,987Hz sound is always 314,987Hz. A cow doesn't change to a sheep no matter how much you poke it with a stick.. But in this case it seems to do so.
     
  20. On my basses with the Bart 3-band and switchable mids (Curbow, MTD, Elrick), I tended to use the 250Hz setting most of the time when I wanted more of a growly, aggresive tone. Then again, I'm really used to the mahogany body Wal tone, so I tend to go for the low-mids a lot.

    Mike