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5 position system

Discussion in 'Ask Michael Dimin' started by Ozz, Mar 1, 2002.


  1. Ozz

    Ozz Guest

    Nov 2, 2001
    suburb of dallas, tx
    Hey Mike,

    I was just wondering if you use or teach your students the 5 position system and if I would benefit from learning it. I came to the bass from playing in jazz groups on the tenor sax so I know a little theory. I've already been studying the major scales and modes on bass but haven't really been thinking about playing in positions. Am I missing out? Should I be thinking in positions?

    Thank you in advance for clearing up my head.
     
  2. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Ozz,
    I've always maintained that "the only dumb questions is the one that I don't know the answer to."

    Seriously, I am unfamiliar with the 5 position system, unless I know it by another name. If you could elaborate, it might just ring a bell.

    Mike
     
  3. Ozz

    Ozz Guest

    Nov 2, 2001
    suburb of dallas, tx
    Cool.

    I think there are 5 positions in 12 frets. A position is a space of 4 frets across however many strings you have. I think there is a way to play in something like 5 keys without shifting out of position.

    I got this idea from a book I've been going through called Serious Electric Bass by Joel Di Bartolo. I'm nearing the chapter on the five position system and am not sure I should be spending time learning positions instead of learning scales all over the neck.
     
  4. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Let me look into it

    Mike
     
  5. Ozz

    Ozz Guest

    Nov 2, 2001
    suburb of dallas, tx
    Thank you, Mike.
     
  6. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Ozz,

    I checked it out, and as I thought it is what I call Scale Forms. This is REALLY GREAT STUFF. You must, absolutley learn this stuff. It really expands the fretboard both vertically and horizontally.

    Mike
     
  7. Hi Mr Dimin!

    It sounds like I'm missing out on something important. Do you know where I could find further information on this?
     
  8. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    First of all "Mr. Dimin" is my Dad, I am and always will be just plain Mike.

    I've now seen the 5 position or scale form idea in 2 books, the first being the aforementioned
    Serious Electric Bass by Joel Di Bartolo the second is in one of the bass books put out by the Musicians Institute (possibly music reading for bass). Finally a more adanced idea on that subject comes from Gary Willis' wonderful book Fretboard harmony for Bass

    Mike
     
  9. Thanks!
     
  10. Ozz

    Ozz Guest

    Nov 2, 2001
    suburb of dallas, tx
    Thanks, Mike

    I appreciate you taking the time to help me out with this. You're helping me become a better player. Thanks.
     
  11. bcarll

    bcarll

    Oct 16, 2001
    Ozz

    MelBay's "Essentials of Modern Bass" (Bunny Brunell the author)has the 5 positions,modes,pentatonic scales, everything you need. The other books listed seem OK too but I am not familiar with them.
    bcarll
     
  12. pedalpointer

    pedalpointer

    Mar 25, 2002
    Brunel's "companion" book for the Bass Essentials book is a collection of exercises based on the system.

    As a side note, I was running through some of the exercises from his first book, up and down scales, in thirds and three and four note patterns, and my nephew, who was visiting, told me that I played really well. I was a little too stunned to tell him I was just practicing basics, and just said, "ummm, thank you."