5 string multiscale wenge neckthrough

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by saved, Dec 7, 2016.


  1. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    Hi there,
    So..i have my wenge woods (neck and fingerboard) still no time to begin :crying:
    I have seached and learnet much for what i will need to build it,so this is the final thread,the one with the progres.
    1st question
    The neck wood is very nice but the waves(i dont know the correct word) is not how i wanted to be.
    They are like Ξ and i know the right is to be like |||
    Will this be a problem?
    My thoughts are that wenge is very strong,so thats not a problem.I also like to build a single piece neck and dont want to cut it and glue it like |||
    I also will instal carbon rods.Whats your opinion to do with the neck wood?
     
  2. MPU

    MPU

    Sep 21, 2004
    Valkeala Finland
    I think wenge is ok flatsawn as well as quartersawn. I would not use cf bars in wenge neck as it's stable and stiff enough without.
     
  3. Beej

    Beej

    Feb 10, 2007
    Vancouver Island
    "grain orientation" :D
     
  4. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    I was expecting that grain is the word (not bird :roflmao:) in Greece the word is water thats why i said waves
     
  5. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    I will use CF rods because i have them from an other project and CF reinforsment sounds better here.It will be my personal bass,but if will sell it years later this will help me to sell it faster and in higher price
     
  6. charlie monroe

    charlie monroe Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2011
    Buffalo, NY
    I beg to differ. The word is, in fact, bird.

     
    Puavo and tzohn like this.
  7. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Flat sawn ()should be fine. But if you really want quartersawn orientation, depending on the dimensions of the board, you can split it lengthwise and rotate the two halves 90° and glue them back up to get |||.
     
  8. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    the dimensions are 7.7cm * 4.6 cm.So i could cut and glue it and become like 9.2cm * 3.6 cm.
    But i prefer to use it as is.I like fat necks anyway so 2-3mm more thickness i think will add strength.
    My previous presicion is maple/wenge/maple/wenge/maple with the maple flat sawn and is very very strong,i know lamination add strengh,but this one will be pure wenge..i saw a "bass of the week"
    with one piece ebony,no truss rod,no nothing and had no problem..
     
  9. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Do use a truss rod.
    Carbon fiber rods are not necessary but won't hurt it.
     
  10. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    of course i will use.I have to build it first.One more question..what thicknes for fretboard?7-8mm?
     
  11. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    People generally make their fretboards in the 6-9 mm range, and you are suggesting right in the middle of that, so, yes.

    It hasn't been mentioned on this forum in a while, but it is extremely helpful to have a book on guitar building. The internet only does so much for you. A book offers information in a well-considered, thoughtfully arranged, and integrated way, as well as including details such as this that are not presented on the internet when you are picking up related and unrelated bits of knowledge. There are two main books (in English) that are widely recognized as very good. One is Hiscock's book, which I originally got from my local library and later bought. The other one I don't remember the name of, but others here may help with that, and it should be mentioned in the sticky FAQs at the top of this forum.
     
    superheavyfunk likes this.
  12. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    Need help with the body template..
    I draw this,is awfull..
    red lines are 21th fret and bridge saddles
    Any help will be pricious
     

    Attached Files:

  13. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    The fretboard paper sheet with the dimensions,is ready is ready,tomorrow maybe i will cut the templates (body,neck,headstock)
     

    Attached Files:

  14. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    What is the angle of your zero fret or nut? It looks like it's at least 40°, pretty steep. As someone who regularly plays a fanned instrument with a zero fret at about 30°, basically the same as Dingwall, I would say that any more than 30° is likely to cause problems in playing -- both when you reach over to fret a C on the B string and are close to crossing over the nut with your hand, and if you ever have to sequentially play on different strings on the first fret.
     
  15. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    I dont know the angle and i didnt know that could be a problem.
    I will put them in a real bass and try to play it and see if its comfortable.
    BTW the scale is a litle bit longer than 37" and the "zero angle fret" is the 11th
     
  16. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Yeah multiscale instrument design has a bunch of unique considerations, you may want to do some more research. For example, 7th fret is "standard" unless you have a smaller degree of fanning, because otherwise you end up like your current design.

    You have to think about
    angle at nut
    angle at bridge
    pickup positioning, and sizing

    That's aside from hardware considerations such as
    bridges
    nut design
    string availability
     
  17. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    The angles at nut and bridge will come their own when i find the correct position of the standardt fret.I will try for yhe 7th to see how it comes.
    I will use humbuckers with blades,not pole pieces and place them straight.
    The strings are not problem,a small company making me custom strings and i can buy 15 sets for all of my life
     
  18. saved

    saved

    Aug 14, 2012
    greece
    What other things should i think about?
     
  19. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Everything affects everything else. So the angles at bridge and nut are affected by:
    position of the perpendicular fret {e.g. 7th)
    amount of multiscale, i.e. x inches or mm of difference in scale length between shortest and longest strings, across y strings
    string spacing at "nut" / "nut" width (this is actually an odd measure on a multiscale, must be taken perpendicular to the centerline at some point)
    string spacing at "bridge" / "bridge" width (this is actually an odd measure on a multiscale, must be taken perpendicular to the centerline at some point)
     
  20. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    This is best seen using Fretfind. For example, start with a configuration something like a Dingwall - 5 strings, 34" - 37"; perpendicular fret at 1/3 scale length, which is approximately the 7th fret; bridge spacing 3/4" or 19mm, nut spacing 3/8" or 9.5mm. Now, do a second one, changing only the nut spacing to 0.2" or 5 mm. The resulting difference in nut angle is pretty scary!

    Keep experimenting, changing just one parameter at a time from the base configuration. This will give you a feel for how the geometry interacts.

    For example, on my first (5-string) bass, I used less-than-standard bridge spacing of 17.5 mm (if I remember the number correctly), and maybe a slightly narrower nut, so I did only 2.5" of multiscale difference so that the bridge and nut angles didn't go all to hell.
     
  21. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jun 19, 2021

Share This Page