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7-strings (F#): Conklin or Roscoe?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Diezel420, Oct 2, 2001.


  1. Just curious, but who makes the better all-around 7 string (w/ the low F#)? Are there major differences in quality, playability, or (most importantly) sound?

    Oh, and JT, I know that you are going to answer "Conklin". But hey, if you've played Roscoes too, tell me about it.

    Thanks!

    Also, I was at conklinguitars.com and saw some info on strings of theirs, and I've never heard anyhting about Conklin strings. Any ideas?
     
  2. WarwickUser

    WarwickUser

    Sep 7, 2000
    Get the Roscoe!!! much better bass IMHO...ive played both and the conklin was very nice dont get me wrong but the roscoe blew me away...im lucky i live around 15 minutes from the roscoe factory :)
     
  3. WarwickUser

    WarwickUser

    Sep 7, 2000
    btw the ones i played had a high f...cant say i see much use for a low f but thats just me
     
  4. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    I've never played either bass strung with an F#, but I must say I MUCH prefered the SKB-3007 to the PRODUCTION Conklins, but it's really NOT a fair comparison. Which Conklins are you referring to? It makes a huge difference.
     
  5. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker Banned

    Jun 10, 2001
    Hey warwickuser, who are you? I live in Greensboro also. Do you play in any local bands? By the way, I've played both brands and it was a toss up. The Conklin I'm referring to is the top of the line American version. They are very nice. I've owned a few Roscoe's and they are nice as well.
     
  6. adrian garcia

    adrian garcia

    Apr 9, 2001
    las vegas. nevada
    Endorsing Artist: Nordy Basses, Schroeder Cabs, Gallien Krueger Amps
    Both great basses - i cant comment on the lo F# however- i had the Bill Dickens for a minute, but frankly, 7 is over the top for me- very well made, the eq takes some time to get used to-
    I have owned a Roscoe, a 5- they are amazing sounding basses- you gotta try them is all i can say- thats gonna be tough though.. i will add this- Bill Conklin is as smooth a person as youre ever gonna find in this bizz- he is a true gentleman.
     
  7. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    From the Conklin guru himself: "the conklin snakeskins are repackaged Dean Markley sr2000 strings, with different color windings (bill conklin doesn't make his own strings yet)."

    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?threadid=8349
     
  8. Can you actually see the f# string's vibrations individually? If it's down around 25 Hz or something, some people's eyes should be able to pick that out. I think movie film is 30 Hz (fps). Some famous baseball hitters can't go to the movies because they see the individual frames even at 30 fps, and it bothers them.
     
  9. boogiebass

    boogiebass

    Aug 16, 2000
    I've never checked out Conklin's custom jobs, just the Korean Dickens and lower level GT's, but I can tell you that the SKB3007 is a great bass. Easily the best B string I've ever heard and that 18v Bart setup is really quite amazing sounding.
     

  10. Movie film runs at 24fps, video runs at 30fps..
     
  11. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    well, i've played a few roscoes (3 to be exact) that were tuned with a low F#. i also have 3 (presently) of my custom conklins tuned to low F#.

    obviously, the conklins were better, in my opinion, since that's what i chose to purchase. that's not to say that the roscoes were bad - they were all great instruments. furthermore, the low F# on my conklins are better than any others that i have played - which include elrick, fodera, curbow and warrior, as well as roscoe and conklin - all fine basses, of course, but as far as low F# goes, my conklins were the best. i have yet to play a low B or a low F# that was better than the low B on my conklins, therefore i purchased conklin basses and have not purchased others.

    ultimately, though, these kinds of questions are pretty ridiculous. nobody can say with impunity how well you are going to like a bass or its performance. you are going to get a bunch of opinions, and some of them will not be based upon factual experience. this will not be readily apparent in a thread like this.

    and no, you can't see the string's vibrations individually, although you can tell that the string is vibrating slower than the others.
     
  12. boogiebass

    boogiebass

    Aug 16, 2000
    Perhaps. But soliciting opinions is what this forum is all about. By sorting through responses, one can get a general impression on various instruments. I consider that rather practical, not ridiculous at all. In my case, I carefully evaluated a number of 7's before deciding to purchase the Roscoe. This was necessarily limited to the instruments I could put my hands on but opinions like those expressed here can definitely help focus in on the "short list."
     
  13. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    that's very true. my only point was that relying too heavily on suggestions from others usually only limits one's potential experience to the sum of experiences of others, and with a forum like the internet, the extent and nature of others' experience is

    there's just a lot of variables, and they come out into play in situations like this heavily.
     
  14. boogiebass

    boogiebass

    Aug 16, 2000
    Several good points, John. I especially agree with your comments re: the F# issue. I've only played a few set up that way and I also found them pretty variable.

    In general, I think the key to putting opinions to practical use is the ability to separate the wheat from the chaff, admittedly not always an easy task!
     
  15. lo-end

    lo-end

    Jun 15, 2001
    PA
    You don't play the seven string bass, it plays YOU.

    :D
     
  16. beermonkey

    beermonkey

    Sep 26, 2001
    Seattle, WA
    First, how long have you been playing bass? In my opinion, you should start with a 4 string and learn to play. After you've spent a great deal of time working with a 4 string (2-3 years depending on how much you practice), move to a 5.. and so on.

    I personally see no use in having more than 5 strings. The whole "it's for jazz, it's for soloing" argument doesn't sit with me, Jaco did it all with 4 strings.

    Whatever, to each his own.. just don't make a mistake and buy something with more strings than you can handle. It's a lot more difficult to keep a 6-7 string bass under control than it is with a 6-7 string guitar.
     
  17. lo-end

    lo-end

    Jun 15, 2001
    PA
    nothing wrong with starting on a five, IMO. Its just those damned high strings that you have to work your way up to... :D

    I wouldnt start with anything with more than 5 strings though.
     
  18. Absolutely...Roscoe!! It doesn't compare to a GT-7. There's a big jump in workmanship when you go to a Roscoe.
     
  19. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    But the USA Conklins and the Roscoes are in the same class. At that price point, workmanship is a given. It comes down to personal preference.
     
  20. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    I don't see the point in starting out with a 4 stringer, if you want to ultimately play a 5.

    I play 4, 5, and 6, and wish that I had started on fretless 5. If I had played fretless 5 for 20+ years, I can't imagine how good I could be.

    Of course, if I had started upright at 8, I could have been phenomenal.